Download PDF

Te Puroko a tau 2014 2014 Annual Report

Download Section

Kaupapa Introduction

 

"Mā kā huruhuru ka rere te manu"
"Without feathers the bird cannot fly"

The CPIT kōwhaiwhai visually represents the five values that underpin the importance and outcomes of education through traditional Māori forms, merging two cultures into one common goal. This kōwahiwhai, developed by our Centre of Māori and Pasifika Achievement, is a beautiful visual reminder of what we at CPIT stand for.

The right section in red reminds us that in our learning and teaching we must kia auaha – innovate – seeking new and better ways to share knowledge. To the left of this the green section is a call to tūhonotia – connect – with our peers, our environment and our inner resourcefulness. On the top left blue section are the three baskets of knowledge representing ākona – learn. The lines flowing to the right of the blue section represent kia akitu – success – which is the result of targetted effort. In the centre of the kōwahiwhai is manaakitaka – respect – for those who taught us and those we will teach in turn.

Our Values

CPIT is committed to the following values that underpin the institute's activities and the way in which we operate:
Akona - Learn
Manaakihia - Respect
Tuhonotia - Connect
Kia auaha - Innovate
Kia akitu - Succeed
 

Our Vision

Our vision is to be Canterbury's leading provider of applied tertiary education, research and knowledge exchange, widely respected by our businesses, industry and cultural communities as a sustainable high performing organisation, driven by excellence and responsible for ensuring all graduates have the knowledge, values and skills to be successful citizens now and in the future. In addition, CPIT will play an essential role in the revitalisation of Christchurch and the Canterbury region, be responsive to the market and in doing so strengthen its connection with industry and community partnerships, reinforcing CPIT's mission.

Our Appreciation

Thank you to all of our students, staff, colleagues, fellow institutions, communities, industries and businesses for contributing to such a successful 2014.

Download Section

Governance & Strategy

Download Section

Kā Whāika Mahere Strategic Goals

CPIT’s strategic plan, set by CPIT’s governing Council, determines the institute’s direction in conjunction with a mix of Government policy directives and regional strategies. It is used to inform CPIT’s Investment Plan which is prepared in consultation with stakeholders and in collaboration with the Tertiary Education Commission.

The strategy sets four specific goals with associated focus areas and measures:

 

Strategic Goal
Expected Outcomes
2014
1 Successful
Graduate
Outcomes
  • CPIT's portfolio delivers programmes that:
  • Are relevant for industry, students and the community
  • Meet the recovery and long term needs of Canterbury
  • Are nationally recognised and internationally benchmarked
  • Have individualised learning plans incorporating Recognition of Prior Learning (RPL) and customised student support
  • Are flexible, responsive and have modularised delivery
  • Enhance creativity, problem solving and active learning
  • Incorporate work-based and dispersed learning environments
2 Responsive
Stakeholder
Partnerships
  • CPIT's partnerships will:
  • Work with government, regional agencies and communities to build a stronger regional economy and communities
  • Build capability and capacity for knowledge and skill exchange that actively supports regional recovery and success
  • Work with other Tertiary Education Organisations (TEOs) and agencies to meet recovery needs
  • Ensure strong CPIT market presence and positioning through effective, innovative communication and marketing initiatives
  • Promote student recruitment with potential domestic student cohorts
  • Support the redevelopment of the international programme
3 Targeting
Equitable
Outcomes
  • CPIT’s targeted engagement will recognise cultural diversity by providing:
  • A holistic context offering effective support for Māori and Pasifika students and their whānau
  • Flexible learning pathways that empower youth and second chance learners
  • Targeted support services for Māori and Pasifika, Disability, Centre for Assessment of Prior Learning (CAPL) and Youth Transition
4 High
Performing
Organisation
  • CPIT’s operational practices will ensure:
  • Staff have the knowledge, skills and attributes to build capacity and capability for future-focused education delivery
  • Consolidation of its role in the sector and collaboration to improve delivery of core business activities
  • Effective utilisation of CPIT’s capital assets, technologies, business systems and environmental sustainability practices
  • Transparent and effective framework for managing performance requirements, risks and challenges
Download Section

Statement of Service Performance

Download Section

Financials

Download Section

Āpitihaka Appendices

In the appendices section of CPIT’s 2014 Annual Report, we:

  • expand on our Equal Education Opportunities and Equal Employment Opportunities.
  • list our strong connections with industry through our many advisory committees and we highlight our academic achievements by profiling staff research outputs.
  • list the Staff Prizes and Awards and Student Prizes and Awards sections, celebrating achievements across the spectrum of CPIT.

Equal Education Opportunities  

Equal Education Opportunities  

Tertiary Students with Disabilities

In 2014, 1,068 students self-identified with a disability (up from 951 in 2013), and 197 accessed support from Disability Services (up from 180 in 2013), with 49% of these students seeking help with a specific learning disability (e.g. dyslexia).

Examples of the support provided by Disability Services include alternative exam arrangements for 105 students, for a total of 320 tests and exams. Disability Services also provided note-taking support for up to 65 classes per week for up to 60 students, and organised two staff development workshops on the learning needs of students with dyslexia and those with mental health difficulties.

Learning Services

Learning Services supported a record number of students in 2014. Compared with 2013, there was an increase of 17% (240 individual students) in student numbers and an increase of 25% (or 920 appointments) in appointment numbers.

Ethnicity data identifying the engagement of key target groups in Learning Services shows an increase across the areas of Māori, Pasifika and youth. The targeted cohorts showed an increase in student numbers with youth growing by 33%, Māori 12% and Pasifika 72%, and an increase in appointments; youth 54%, Māori 28% and Pasifika 50%. The average number of appointments per student was 2.78 for all students; for youth it was 2.53, Māori 3.07 and Pasifika 2.31.

Multiculturalism

Student Ethnicity

2014 2013
Pākehā/European 73.2% 75.5%
NZ Māori 11.6% 11.3%
Pasifika 3.6% 3.6%
Chinese 4.9% 2.8%
Korean 1.5% 1.3%
Indian 3.1% 1.2%
Other Asian 5.8% 4.4%
Other 5.9% 7.6%

Note: Students can specify more than one ethnicity.

Gender and Childcare

All students 2014 2013
Male 46.2% 45.6%
Female 53.8% 54.4%

In 2014, 53.8% of enrolled students were women and 46.2% were men. CPIT has two full-time Early Learning Centres at Madras Street Campus including a privately run Bilingual Centre (Te Waka Huruhurumanu ki Otautahi). These centres provide on-campus childcare facilities to support the educational opportunities of parents and caregivers with preschool children.

Eliminating Harassment

Information about harassment continues to be included in the Student Notebook and on the student website (Campus Life), which makes explicit that discrimination, harassment or intimidation are unacceptable and that the Harassment Complaint Procedure applies to all CPIT staff, students and visitors.

All students are also made aware of their rights and responsibilities during orientation to their programmes. They are also informed about how and where to seek support if they are experiencing or observing harassment.

Youth Guarantee

Youth Guarantee is a youth pathway programme designed for 16-17 year olds who want to start their skills training in a tertiary environment. The programme is designed to transition youth to further training or employment.

In 2014, 341 students were enrolled in the Youth Guarantee scheme, and of the 263 students who provided post-study destination information, 221 are either in employment or further study.

Canterbury Tertiary College

In 2014 the Canterbury Tertiary College (CTC) continued to extend the dual enrolment offering to Canterbury schools to enable access and greater success for students in NCEA Level 2. 414 students were enrolled in this programme in 2014, up from 398 in 2013.

Of the CTC students enrolled in 2014, 291 completed their programme, and 356 are now in employment or further education.

Targeted Funding

Ministry of Education Supplementary Grants increased from 18.2 EFTS in 2013 to 25.4 EFTS in 2014. This assisted delivery of courses in English Language, adult literacy and special services or additional staffing to address the needs of Māori and Pasifika, tertiary students with disabilities and students with severe disabilities.

Adult and Community Education

1,031 students were enrolled in ACE courses in 2014. These were primarily in computing, English for Speakers of Other Languages and Māori Language courses, as well as through the Next Step Centre for Women.

Māori and Pasifika

2014 2013
Māori students course completion rate 75.8% 74.0%
Pasifika students course completion rate 71.8% 68.5%

2014 saw the implementation of a number of specific initiatives aimed at increasing the participation and success of Māori students as part of The Māori Advancement Kaupapa launched in 2013. The first Māori professional networks were initiated in the areas of STEM, Health, and Te Reo Māori. As part of the work to promote Māori into higher level qualifications CPIT launched the first Eke Takaroa publication, promoting and celebrating the success of CPIT’s Māori graduates.

In collaboration with our industry and Iwi partners, He Toki ki te Rika (Māori Trades Training) initiative extended its provision of higher level qualifications for Māori students through the delivery of leadership pathways in National Certificate in Construction, National Diploma in Construction Management, National Diploma in Quantity Surveying, and National Diploma in Architectural Technology qualifications. The collaboration also launched He Toki ki te Mahi, the new Group Training Scheme aimed at supporting He Toki ki te Rika graduates through to full apprenticeships and employment.

The Eke Panuku Awards, to celebrate Māori and Pasifika student success across the institution, had a record number of recipients in 2014. The Whānau Induction Booklet for Māori students and their whānau was developed as a tool in 2014 as part of the Māori student retention strategy to support whānau to make informed decisions around student’s training and preparation for study.

The Pasifika Trades initiative has also continued to develop in 2014 although numbers of students engaged fell short of set targets. As with He Toki ki Te Rika, this was largely a result of changes to the funding contract which saw a new age criterion in 2014, funding only those students aged 18-34. CPIT continued to engage and support Māori and Pasifika students who fell outside this age range, which equated to 43.55% of the total of Māori and Pasifika students engaged.

The Office of the Kaiārahi worked alongside the Pasifika staff and community to develop a new vehicle for community engagement through the establishment of a Pasifika Advisory Group. A new Pasifika Strategy for CPIT was also drafted in November 2014 after initial consultation with key stakeholders and this will be finalised in 2015.

Equal Employment Opportunities  

Equal Employment Opportunities  


The work initiated in 2012 with regard to a focused approach to staff wellbeing and support has continued. CPIT maintains a focus on diversity, biculturalism and flexible working and remains a committed member of the Equal Employment Opportunities Trust (EEOT). We work to ensure that the principles of EEO are embedded in all of our people, policies and practices.

Workplace Diversity

CPIT’s ethnicity profile shows that the majority of our staff identify as Pakeha/NZ European and other Caucasian ethnicities from Europe, North America, Australia and South Africa.

Biculturalism

Treaty of Waitangi Awareness courses continue to be provided with good uptake during 2014. 54 staff participated in these courses.

Staff Wellness

Our approach to supporting staff wellbeing and ensuring staff are well looked after included:

1 Staff Wellbeing Committee

Supported by Human Resources, the Staff Wellbeing Committee has continued to provide a superb and well supported service through 2014, organising many events and ongoing activities. Many of these were established prior to 2014 but there continues to be a high level of enthusiasm and innovative ideas, as well as events that are quickly becoming annual favourites. Events included fundraising baking competition and sales for Movember and Breast Cancer and a number of other charities, mid-year themed event and many other activities that recognised the importance of staff wellbeing. The Committee, which consists of a good representation of the diverse nature of CPIT staff, meet regularly and plan and run these events on a voluntary basis.

2 Earthquake Leave

The official specific provision of earthquake leave ended in December 2013, CPIT however recognises that hardship continues to be experienced in relation to the extended recovery work being undertaken in Canterbury and has therefore continued to provide special leave on a case by case basis.

3 Smokefree at CPIT

1 January 2013 saw CPIT become smokefree and this policy has continued to be embedded into the business as usual activities of the institution during 2014. Support continues to be provided by the Health Centre and campus signage reflects CPIT’s Smokefree status.

Staff with Disabilities

CPIT continues to support the mainstream programme of supported employment for people with disabilities or rehabilitation following an illness or injury. This is part of our on-going commitment to a diverse workforce.

Staff Demographics

Reflecting international trends, employee demographics continue to show an aging population with staff aged 40+ comprising 58% of CPIT's workforce in 2014. As a result, CPIT began implementing a rejuvenated approach to retirement planning in 2014, through enhanced retirement planning workshops and improved support mechanisms for retiring staff members. This is expected to continue into 2015.

Future Focus

CPIT’s commitment to a diverse workforce and EEO programmes is aligned with the Investment Plan and the Workforce Strategy 2012-2017 with a focus on:

  • Continuing focus on staff wellbeing.
  • Identifying ways to encourage and support all academic and allied staff to operate in ways that are respectful to, and effective for, Māori/Pasifika learners.
  • Developing and maintaining a staff recruitment/retention plan to support existing and increasing numbers of Māori/ Pasifika staff across CPIT.
  • EEO programmes to align with the delivery and development of the Māori Exemplar tool and continue to incorporate the principles of the Māori Exemplar Project (MEP) into work practices for both academic and allied staff.
  • Increase awareness of multiculturalism and develop overseas exchange programmes for staff.
  • Continuing the Staff Day initiated in 2013 as an annual professional development event.

External Programme Advisory Committees and Consultation Networks 

External Programme Advisory Committees and Consultation Networks 

CPIT is committed to working with the industries, professions and communities we serve. One way of achieving this is through Programme Advisory Committees or Consultation Networks listed below. Each programme is supported by a group of varying size and composition, depending on the needs of that programme. The Chair appointed by the group is usually external to the institution. Most groups include student or former student representation as well as staff representatives (whose names are not included).

The members listed have given their permission to publish their names in the CPIT Annual Report. We are grateful for their support and appreciate their input throughout the year.

Canterbury Tertiary College

Grumball, Mike

Southern Institute of Technology

Lawrence, Rob

Canterbury Employers Chamber of Commerce

Morris, James

Darfield High School

Paiti, Margaret

Linwood College

Te Hemi, Hemi

Te Tapuae o Rēhua

Shearer, David

Canterbury Development Corporation

Wilson, Mark

Cashmere High School

Department of Applied Sciences & Allied Health

Bachelor of Applied Science (Specialisation)

Bailey, David (Chair)

Christchurch City Council

Ansell, Iain

Academy of Sport

Clearwater, Alice

Student Representative

Gloag, Nicole

Student Representative

Haggart, John

Self Employed/Sporting Coach

Hollands, Mark

High Performance Sport

Kuhns, Gabriella

Student Representative

Mene, Chris

Community and Public Health

Murray, Dave

Student Representative

Ruscoe, Melissa

Industry Representative

Vabulis, Sophie

Sport Canterbury, Industry Representative

Wardy, Ben

Student Representative

Winslow, Kelly

Student Representative

Medical Imaging

Niven, Shona (Chair)

Nelson Marlborough District Health Board

Butler, Dr Anthony

Royal Australian and NZ College of Radiologists

Duncan, Jamie

Capital and Coast District Health Board

Gearry, Jessica

Student Representative (Year 3)

Gibson, Lynda

South Canterbury District Health Board

Hislop, Amy

Student Representative (Graduate)

Jones, Alan

Student Representative (Year 2)

Kelly, Beryl

Counties Manukau District Health Board

Lister, Jason

West Coast District Health Board

Metcalfe, Julia

Medical Radiation Technologists Board

Miller, Kathryn

Invercargill Representative

Nelis, Henri

Student Representative (Year 3)

Newton, Toni

Student Representative (Year 1)

Oliver, Jill

Southern District Health Board

Speechlay, Therese

Canterbury District Health Board

Thomas, Harriet

Student Representative (Year 2)

Thomas, Philip

Nelson Marlborough District Health Board

Wilkinson, Lauren

Capital Coast District Health Board

Midwifery

Faulls, Kay (Chair)

NZ College of Midwives

Anderson, Sally

Canterbury District Health Board

Baddock, Sally

Otago Polytechnic

Barnes, Karen

Canterbury District Health Board

Bigsby, Marg

Royal NZ Plunket Society

Burke, Samantha

Canterbury District Health Board

Carter, Jenny

Royal NZ Plunket Society

Cronje, Alex

La Leche League

Cross, Graham

Nelson Marlborough District Health Board

Cunningham, Elizabeth

Rōpu Kawa Whakaruruhau

Daniell, Amanda

Canterbury District Health Board

Dockrall, Julie

South Canterbury District Health Board

Erkkia, Marnie

Home Birth Association

Frater, Tracey

Parents Centre

Gray, Elaine

NZ College of Midwives

Gray, Sonya

Self-employed midwife

Green, Catherine

Canterbury District Health Board

Mackay, Brenda

Student Representative (Year 1)

McClure, Liz

Royal NZ Plunket Society

Plaisted, Amy

Student Representative (Year 2)

Ryde, Jo

Self-employed midwife

Salton, Suzanne

Canterbury District Health Board

Skinner, Jessica

Student Representative (Year 3)

van Uden, Anna

St George’s Hospital

Vares, Tinna

Tertiary Education Sector

Science

Keller, Joe (Chair)

Retired

Bailey, Dr Karen

Gribbles Veterinary Pathology

Bird, Tony

Student Representative

Brennan, Jane

RED HOT (Fire & Forensic Investigations)

Deljo, Sohaila

Student Representative

Evans-Thompson, Bronnie

Student Representative

Ford, Tony

Meadow Mushrooms

Love, Dr John

ESR, Christchurch

Nagaiya, Karishma

Graduate

Scholes, Paula

ESR, Christchurch

Veterinary Nursing & Animal Care

Bailey, Dr Karen (Chair)

Gribbles Veterinary Pathology

Eddy, Barbara

Straven Road Veterinary Centre Ltd

Fernandez, Tania

Marshall & Pringle (Linwood) Veterinarians

Graham, Roberta

Student Representative

King, Tahlia

Hornby Veterinary Centre

Mahalm, Jasmine

SPCA

Mehrtens, Dr Geoff

Veterinary Surgeon

Murphy, Annabel

SPCA

Ross, Ian

After Hours Veterinary Clinic Ltd)

Thorstensen, Sarah

Student Representative

Van’t Wout, Lucy

Student Representative

Department of Business

Retimana, Lee (Chair)

Muritai Marketing

Coldicott, Peter

Self Safe

Barker, Catherine

Student Representative

Ewart, Baden

Harrington, Murray

PricewaterhouseCoopers

Magee, Jim

Nurse Maude

Murphy, Lauren

Duncan Cotterill

Smith, Ian

Department of Computing

Ascroft, John (Chair)

Jade Software

Batt, David

DipCN Student Representative

Black, Graham (resigned June 2014)

City Care

Brock-Smith, Sam

Snap

Burgess, Ian

The Total Team

Butler, Susan

DICT Student Representative

Calderwood, Victoria

BICT Student Representative

Carter, Jan

Careers New Zealand

Connor, Ana

Foodstuffs (South Island) Ltd

Daly, Connon

The IT Team

Dever, Chris

Canterbury District Health Board

Glynn, Kerry

Global Bake

Grant, Matthew

BICT Student Representative

Hanna, Amgad

GradDipICT Student Representative

Hohepa, Kiri

Black Bay

Lim, Harrison

BICT Student Representative

Liu, Cici

GradDipICT Student Representative

Marriott, Douglas

DICT Student Representative

Matthews, Jason

DipCN Student Representative

Morris, Ethan

Youth Guarantee Student Representative

Nooney, Mike (resigned)

Pay Global

Pienaar, Loki

GradDipICT Student Representative

Seatter, Peter

DICT Student Representative

Smith, Nathan

BICT Student Representative

Whitfield, Scott

Wynyard Group

Wild, Steven (resigned September 2014)

Wild Software Ltd

Wilkinson, Sue

Hairy Lemon

Department of Creative Industries

Bachelor of Musical Arts

Bell, Judith (Chair)

Music Educationalist

Barus, Matt

Songwriter

Ferguson, Naomi

Singer

Kaa, Henare

Musician/Promoter

Royal, Marc

Christchurch Music Industry Trust (CHART)

Fashion

Buckley, Raewyn

St Andrew’s College

Coleman, Jane

Longbeach Holdings

Copeland, Amelia

Student Representative

Crisp, Caitlin

Student Representative

Davies, Annie

Student Representative

Dinsenbacher, Sophie

Student Representative

Dixon, Vicki

Hagley College

Henschel, Ruth

St Margaret’s College

Keats, Trudy

St Margaret’s College

Lee, Barbara

Panache

O'Callaghan, Jan

Rangi Ruru College

Scandrett, Denise

VanRoli Manufacturing

Stevens, John

Shalimar Knitwear

Strangwick, Tara

Kathmandu

Tipler, Arlene

Longbeach Holdings

Torrance, Lynley

Albion Clothing

Waltham, Brian

Black Manufacturing

NASDA

Aldridge, Philip

The Court Theatre

Bartlett, John

Pacific Blue

Gänzl, Kurt

Encyclopaedia of Musical Theatre

Morrow, Shane

Riccarton High School

Spooner, Rutene

Performer

Bachelor of Design

Arnold, Matt

Sons and Co

Bathgate, Alec

Bathgate Design

Billing, Caroline

The National, Curator

Cooper, Jenny

Illustrator

Elworthy, Antony

Animator

King, Brett

Interactive designer

McCarthy, Steven

McCarthy Design

Prentice, Michael

Designworks

Reid, Ben

Printmaker

Wood, Luke

University of Canterbury

Wrightstow, Pippin

f3design

Graduate Diploma in Information Design

Harding, Emma (Chair)

Streamliners

Churches, Kay

AMI Insurance

Crossland, John

Allied Telesis Labs NZ

Panckhurst, Jenna

Jade Software

Professional Photography

Wethey, David (Chair)

Southern Cross Digital Ltd

Linton, Richard

Linton Photography

McPhail, Damon

Damon Photography

Meredith Dyer

Meredith Clare Photography

van Heyningen, Diederik

Lightworkx Photography

van Kan, Johannes

Flax Studios

New Zealand Broadcasting School – Journalism Stream

Francis, Bill (Chair)

Radio Broadcasters Association

Finlayson, Asher

Fairfax

Gillespie, John

TVNZ

Gurney, Dallas / Gibson, Anne-Marie

NZME

Jennings, Mark / Sutherland, Richard

TV3

Jones, Melanie

TV3

Jones, Melanie

MediaWorks

Rees, Jeremy

NZ Herald

Woods, Gael

Radio NZ

New Zealand Broadcasting School – Radio Stream

Francis, Bill (Chair)

Radio Broadcasters Association

Clamp, Rodger

Mediaworks Radio

Fordham, Gemma

NZME Radio

Gandy, Sarah

NZME Radio

Winstanley, Jason

NZME Radio

Wratt, Leon

Mediaworks Radio

New Zealand Broadcasting School – Digital Film and Television Stream

Clarke, Laurie (Chair)

Top Shelf

Baker, Grant

Images and Sound

Cowsill, John

Sky Television

King, Chris

TV3

Standidge, Ray

NZ Live TV

Digital Video Post-Production

Coombe, Marten

Sauce, Wellington

Gribble, Emma

Whitebait TV

Kennard, Raymond

Red 5

McInnes, Tim

Ruffell Films

Mills, Chris

TV3, Auckland

Slack, Jacob

TVNZ, Auckland

Department of Engineering & Architectural Studies

Architecture

Cumberpatch, Ian (Chair)

Cumberpatch Architects

Corsbie, Colin

Opus International

Gregory, Bill

Warren & Mahoney

Hayman, Richard

Jasmax Ltd

Hill, Colin

Hill & Miles Architecture

Miles, Grant

Hill & Miles Architecture

Turner, Angela

Warren & Mahoney

Engineering

Allan, Graham (Chair)

Structex

Blokland, Geoff

Fulton Hogan Ltd

Caughley, Alan

Callaghan Innovation

Clarke, Ron

Christchurch City Council

Copeland, Richard

Tait Electronics

Forrest,Cathy

AECOM

Fulton, Michael

Fulton Hogan Ltd

Harteveld, Stephen

Connetics Ltd

Haslett, Greg

Christchurch City Council

Hellyer, Scott

Texco Steel

Hirsch, Stephen

Orion NZ

Jenkins, Richard

Beca

Kennedy, Steve

SunGard Systems

Macgregor, Joanne

C Lund and Son Ltd

Norris, David

NZMEA

Ogilvie, Andrew

Airways

Pettigrew, Warren

Dynamic Controls

Read, Andrew

Pedersen Read

Richards, David

Enable New Zealand

Ritchie, Tracey

Tait Electronics

Sharp, David

TYCO and IPENZ Canterbury

Vogt, Rainer

Pedersen Read

Wells, Graeme

Design Association of New Zealand/Structural Design

Woolley, Duncan

Spunlite

Interior Décor & Design

Webb, Dudley (Chair)

Weco Manufacturing

Ackroyd, Colin

Design Resource Centre

Attwood, Chris

Dore’s for Floors Ltd

Breen, Donna-Maree

The Laminex Group

Corson, Don

Donald W Corson Handmade Watches

Gallon, Rebecca

The Home Ideas Centre

Hiatt, Henrietta

Resene Colour Shop

Moore, Veronica

Veronica Moor Interior

Department of Food, Hospitality & Trades (Madras Street)

Food & Hospitality

Wall, Ed (Chair)

Southern Hospitality

Ashby, Bronwyn

Spice Paragon

Binney, Craig

Scenic Hotel Group

Clarke, Andrew

Just Desserts

Coleman, Trish

Self Employed

Cook, Ciaran

Professional Cookery Graduate

Chillingworth Road

Jeursen, Belinda

Baking Industry Association of New Zealand

MacFarlane, Zoliekah

Student Representative

McLay, Jahana

Student Representative

Maynard, Nathan

The George

Miller, Gary

Kitchen Productions

Mohi, Aaliyah

Student Representative

Murray, Pakitae

Student Representative

Patterson, Michael

Commodore Airport Hotel

Porteous, Gary

Aranui High School

Straight, Vivienne

Marian College

Wall, James

LoneStar Papanui

Department of Humanities

English Language

Boyer, Joan

English Language Partners

O’Connor, Patrick

PEETO

Quinn, Heidi

University of Canterbury

Saunders, Sue

CANTESOL)

Taylor, Gill

English Language Partners

Foreign Languages

McCormick, Nicola

Villa Maria College

Ogino, Dr Masahiko

University of Canterbury

Tappenden, Linda

Cashmere High School

Key Skills Consultancy Network

Anderson, Jane

Allenvale School

Arnold, Margaret

YMCA

Black, Dee

CCS Disability Action

Bird, Sue

LifeLinks

Carter, Jan

Careers NZ

Crawford, Gray

Christchurch City Mission

Green, April

AVIVA

Naoe, Kiyomine

Kiwi Family Trust

Patterson, Torika

PSUSI

Reid, Wayne

Partnership Health

Rose, Anne-Marie

Hagley Community College

Tatana, Linda

Ministry of Social Development

TThomas, Sally

CCS Disability Action

Matua Pasifika

Esera, Mrs Atagai

Faitotonu, Mr Siale

Filoialii, Mr Patele Paulo

Gower, Mrs Louisa

Lagatule, Mrs Tufuga

Newport, Mrs Guinivere

Parr, Mrs Sulia

Peaufa, Mr Mike

Pitomaki, Mr John

Tatafu, Dr Makafalani

Vili, Rev Tumama

Sustainability & Outdoor Education

Allan, Stu

Active Voice

Bennett, Matt

Sir Edmund Hillary Outdoor Pursuits Centre

Boyes, Mike

University of Otago

Brash, Dave

Dunedin Climbing Company

Brown, Mike

University of Waikato

Burtenshaw, Chris

New Zealand Outdoor Instructors Association

Cameron, Bruce

St Bede’s College

Campbell, Rich

Appalachian State University, USA

Cant, Matt

New Zealand Outdoor Instructors Association

Carpenter, Daryll

New Zealand Mountain Safety Council

Chaplow, Paul

Outdoors New Zealand

Cooper, Peter

Oxford Area School

Colagiuri, Paul

Somerset Camp

Dawkings, Peter

St Andrews College

Entwistle, John

Peak Experience

Grogan, Dave

Mt Hutt Ski School

Gulley, Garth

OutdoorsMark

Haddock, Cathye

Ministry of Education

Holland, Penny

New Zealand Outdoor Instructors Association

Hopkinson, Mick

NZ Kayak School

Magnall, Dave

Outward Bound NZ

Murphy, Eddie

Christchurch Boy’s High School

Noble, John

Redcliffs Primary School

Papprill, Jocelyn

Environment Canterbury Regional Council/NZ Association of Environmental Education

Taylor, Chris

St Patrick’s College, Wellington

Thevenard, Liz

Education Outdoors New Zealand

Thompson, Andy

Otago Polytechnic Outdoor Programme and New Zealand Outdoor Instructors Association President

Whethey, Tim

The Roxx

Teacher Education

La Porte, Therese (Chair)

New Zealand Institute of Management

Dillon, Jane

Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology

Hitchcock, John

Wellington Institute of Technology

O’Steen, Billy

University of Canterbury

Stewart, Deb

Eastern Institute of Technology

Te Kāhui Kaumātua

Batchelor, Marion

Burke, Jane

Connell, Kōkā Alamein

Edwards, Bill

Hutchen, Mrs Kiwa

Kaa, Mr Wharekawa

Kipa, Terehia

Pokaia, Ruawhitu

Puanaki, Tihi

Puanaki, Wiremu

Ngarimu, Ranui

Riddel, Evelyn

Roder, Elsie

Te Hae, Mita

Ward, May

Te Mātāpuna o Te Mātauraka
Advisory Network

Connell, Kōkā Alamein

Cranwell, Iaean

Cunningham, Elizabeth

Edwards, Henare

Gregory, Daryl

Gully, Nichole

Hughes, Marina

Hond, Ruakere

Hughes, Marina

Hutchen, Kiwa

Mahuika, Irihapeti

Ngarimu, Ranui

O’Regan, TāTipene

Pitama, Suzanne

Pokaia, Ruawhitu

Rangipunga, Charisma

Rewi, Dr Poia

Richards, Hayden

Riddell, Evelyn

Rigby, Paula

Roder, Elsie

Rohs, John

Romana, Harry

Seymour, Dallas

Singh, Dot

Tarena, Eruera

Tipa, Justin

Ward, May

Department of Nursing & Human Services

Human Services

Grant, John (Chair)

Skillwise

Avia, Loluama

Ministry of Justice

Buchanan, Richard

Private Consultant – Disability Sector

Johnstone, Mark

Open Home Foundation

Meechang, Maree

Child, Youth and Family Services

Meyer, Marie

New Zealand Association of Counsellors

Rewha, Christopher

Child, Youth and Family Services

Nursing

Gunn, Diana (Chair)

Canterbury District Health Board

Anderson, Julia

New Zealand Nurses’ Organisation

Bousfield, Karyn

West Coast District Health Board

Dallas, Janette

Canterbury District Health Board

Finlay, Annette

Rōpu Kawa Whakaruruhau

Henderson, Robyn

Nelson Marlborough District Health Board

Hickmott, Rebecca

Canterbury District Health Board

Monahan, Karen

Nelson Marlborough Institute of Technology

Palmer, Trish

Aged Care Association New Zealand

Patira, Phil

Canterbury District Health Board Specialist Health

Phillips, Gail

NZ College of Mental Health Nurses

Rees, Jane

College of Nurses Aotearoa (NZ) Inc

Robertson, Kelly (resigned November 2014)

Primary Health Care Nursing

Schluter, Philip

University of Canterbury

Mental Health Support Work
Reference Group

Sutton, Kim (Chair)

Stepping Stone Trust

Cooper, Vicki

Comcare Trust

Cottle, Cheryl

Brackenridge Estate

Grant, Elly

Purapura Whetu Trust

Harris, Joyce

Supporting Families in Mental Illness

Nobes, Beth

Mental Health Advocacy and Peer Support (MHAPS)

O’Malley, Lyn

Cannon Hill Residential Care

Quigley, Teresa

Canterbury District Health Board

Wilkinson, Adele (resigned May 2014)

Mental Health Education and Resource Centre

Rōpu Kawa Whakaruruhau

(Programmes in Nursing, Midwifery, Social Work)

Cunningham, Elizabeth

(Kaiwhakahaere/Chair)

Dallas-Katoa, Wendy

Registered Nurse

Finlay, Annette

Registered Nurse

Keepa Hunuhunu, Diana (resigned September 2014)

Registered Midwife

Reriti-Crofts, Aroha

Taua

Department of Food, Hospitality & Trades (Sullivan Avenue)

Automotive

Bailey, Murray

Rolleston Garage

Barnard, Gregg

Team Hutchinson Ford

Brooks, Martin

Aceomatics Transmission Ltd

Caulder, Allan

Jeff Gray BMW

Clinch, Shane

Clinch Automotive

Crabb, Wayne

Edgeware Automotive

Crowe, Trevor

Crowe Sports

Duffy, Jeremy

Armstrong Prestige

Frith, Andy

Paul Kelly Motor Company

Gerring, Stewart

Parks Garage Ltd

Graves, Wayne

Autothority

Hawkey, Chris

Archibalds

Hayes, Phil

Avon City Ford

Jennings, David

Auto Agencies Ltd

Lambie, Christine

Motor Trade Association (MTA)

McConnell, Jason

Hi Tech Auto Parts

McCormick, Andrew

Lincoln Automotive Ltd

Mills, Andy

Blackwells Motor Group

Price, Paul

Jade Automotive

Rose, Chris

Cranford St Garage

Sanders, Joris

Leading Edge Automotive

Smith, Kent

Jeff Gray BMW

Southerland, Ross

Southern Four Wheel Drive Ltd

Stephens, Roger

Roger Stephens Motors Ltd

Titheridge, Craig

Armstrong Peugeot & Subaru

Trumper, Andy

Autobody Equipment Ltd (ABE)

Wilson, Richard

Donnithorne Simms Mitsubishi

Darryl Malloch and Steve Glue

Armagh Automotive Ltd

Autobody

Andrews, Roy

Andrews & Gilmore Panel and Paint Ltd

Butland, Paul

Atomic Collision Centre

Easton, Brian

Superfinish Panel and Paint

Fletcher, Andrew

Brown & Paterson

Flowerday, Warren

Tandem Smash Repairs

Grainger, Darryn

Gary A Smith Ltd

Lockie, Dave

R J Paterson Ltd

Construction

Allen, Nigel

Nigel Allen Builders Ltd

Chrisholm, Colin

Fulton Hogan Civil

Freeman, Dave

Higgs Builders Ltd

Gibb, Richard

HRS Construction Ltd

Goss, Graham

Builder

Harris, Jack

Fletchers Construction

Hedgecock, Duncan

Advanced Brick and Block

Jenkins, Paul

Stonewood Homes

Sommerville, Steven

BCITO - Skills Broker

Ward, Neville

BCITO

Wheeler, Anthony

Wheelers Limited

Civil

Baigent, Rebecca

City Care Ltd

Caddick, Bernard

Caddick Plasterers & Tilers Ltd

Downer, Andy

Downer Construction (NZ)

Peck, Bill

Frith Industries

Seipp, Peter

Connell Contractors Ltd

Sutton, Dominic

Frith Industries

Thelning, Simon

S A Thelning Brick & Blocklayer

Tolerton, Mason

Stronger Christchurch Infrastructure Rebuild Team (SCIRT)

Electrical

Brown, Robyn

Skills Organisation

Byers, Stephen

Orion New Zealand Limited

Dawson, Mark

Skills Organisation

Goodenough, John

Connetics

Horton, Helen

A Electrical Ltd

Hughes, Warren

Melray Electric Ltd

Prebble, Rex

Christchurch Electrical Ltd

Ray, Robbie

Aotea Electric Ltd

Stevens, Doug

Tucker Electrical

Trotter, Geoff

Saxon Appliances Ltd

Wojtas, Stan

Skills Organisation

Manufacturing

Anderson, Stewart

Lyttelton Engineering Ltd

Cameron, Grant

Hamilton Jet

Fyfe, Warwick

Mace Engineering Ltd

Hawe, David

Carlton Taylor Industries

Lawry, Tania

Integrated Hydraulics

Roche, Steve

Enztec

Taege, Keith

Taege Engineering

Van Grisven, Reiner

Ewing Engineering Contractors

Welding

Buchanan, Wayne

Canterbury Steel Structures Ltd

Dodds, Brett

Pegasus Engineering

Hellyer, Scott

Texco Steel Ltd

Howman, Steve

Taymac Engineering

Lattinmore, Alan

Texco Steel Ltd

Mitchell, Ross

Competenz

Walker, Lawrence

Pegasus Engineering

Williamson, Simon

Pegasus Engineering

Furniture & Joinery

Attenburng, Gary

MWF Joinery Manufacturing Excellence Ltd

Cowan, Stuart

J B Joinery Ltd

Dreaver, Graeme

Classique Furniture Ltd

Hunt, Bernie

Sydenham Joinery Ltd

McClintock, Don

Don’s Joinery Ltd

McKenzie, Alister

Royal Furniture Ltd

McLachlan, Evan

Joinery by Design

Moore, Nathan

Hagley Building Products

Ward, Neville

BCITO

Painting & Decorating

Dietmar, Dyck

Canterbury Master Painters New Zealand

Joseph, Dave

Pacific Décor Ltd

McNicholl, Glen

Dulux

Milligan, Steve

0800 we Paint

Montgomery, Dan

Inside Out Painters

Ngarimu, Duso

Positive Painters Ltd

O’Donnell, Paul

Canterbury Master Painters New Zealand

Robertson, Russell

Pacific Décor Ltd

Spencer, Jeremy

Spencer Painters & Decorators

Spencer, Peter

Spencer Painters & Decorators

Staples, Layton

Spencer Painters & Decorators

Taylor, Rodney

Complete Coatings Ltd

Thomas, Greg

The Makeover Decorating Company

Walker Tony

Competitive Painters Ltd

Ward, Neville

BCITO

Wright, Ali

BCITO

Plasterboard

Hall, Terry

Synergy Contract Services Ltd

McMinn, Cody

Aoraki Polytechnic

Peek, Doug

Weaver Decorating & Maintenance

Scales, Richard

Winston Wallboards Ltd

Welch, Terry

TWC Contracting Ltd

Plumbing

Abbott, Jeff

Plumbing World

Brown, Robyn

Skills Organisation

Dale, Anthony

Apprenticeship Training Trust

De Gouw, Martin

Clynne and Bennie Plumbing

Diver, Michael

Peter Diver Plumbing

Gardiner, Jonny

Inline Plumbing Ltd

Hooker, Geoff

G G Don Ltd

Lightbown, Barry

Christchurch City Council

Walsh, Simon

Gascraft Engineering Ltd

Whitehead, Mark

Whitehead Plumbing and Gas Ltd

Wojtas, Stan

Skills Organisation

Staff Research Outputs  

Staff Research Outputs  

Academic Division

Chapter in Book

Chan, S. (2014). Dietetic baked products. In W. Zhou & Y.H. Hui (Eds.). Bakery Products Science and Technology (2nd ed., pp. 639-656). Stafford BC, QLD, Australia: Wiley-Blackwell.

Conference Contribution - Full conference paper

Chan, S. (2014). Shaken into flexible and mobile delivery: One institution's experiences. Presented at the Institute of Adult Learning Symposium, Singapore.

Conference Contribution - Other

Chan, S. (2014). Learning a trade: not just observation and practice (video). Presented at the AVETRA OctoberVET - trades, apprentices and VET, Melbourne, VIC, Australia.

Conference Contribution - Paper in published proceedings

Cameron, C. & Catt, C. (2014). Learning centre practice in Aotearoa/New Zealand: Preliminary report. In H. Martin & M. Simkin (Eds.). Hikina te manuka!: Learning connections in a changing environment: Proceedings of the 2013 Annual International Conference of the Association of Tertiary Learning Advisors of Aotearoa/New Zealand (pp. 1-18). Napier, New Zealand: ATLAANZ.

Conference Contribution - Poster presentation

Chan, S. (2014). Deploying learner-centred flexible delivery with tablets. Presented at the Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education Conference, Dunedin, New Zealand.

Conference Contribution - Oral presentation

Chan, S. (2014). Leveraging social media: to assist healthy living. Presented at the ANA Nutrition and Physical Activity Forum, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Chan, S. (2014). Learning a Trade. Presented at the New Zealand VET Research Forum, Wellington, New Zealand.

Chan, S., Taylor, D., Cowan, L. & Davies, N. (2014). Deploying student / peer feed-back to improve the learning of skills and dispositions with video. Presented at the Sino-NZ VET Research Forum, Tianjin, Peoples Republic of China.

Chan, S. (2014). Learning a trade: Apprentices' perspectives on workplace learning. Presented at the 17th AVETRA International Conference, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.

Journal Article

Chan, S. (2014). Crafting an occupational identity: Learning the precepts of craftsmanship through apprenticeship. Vocations and Learning: Studies in vocational and professional education, 7(3), 313-330.

Chan, S. (2014). Belonging to a workplace: first-year apprentices’ perspectives on factors determining engagement and continuation through apprenticeship. International Journal for Educational and Vocational Guidance.

Department of Applied Science and Allied Health

Awarded Doctoral Thesis

Ryan, C.(2014). Life as a Carded Athlete. University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand.

Chapter in book

Martis, R. (2014). Food talk with young pregnant women. In L. Davies & R. Deery (Eds.). Nutrition in pregnancy and childbirth. Food for thought (pp. 98-114). New York, NY: Routledge.

Daellenbach, R. (2014) Nourishment: a sociological exploration of food, culture and identity. In L. Davies & R. Deery (Eds.). Nutrition in pregnancy and childbirth, Food for thought (pp. 59-70). London, England Routledge: Routledge.

Davies, L., Deery, R., and Katz-Rotman, B. (2014) Pregnancy and Food. In P. B. Thompson and D. M. Kaplan, Encyclopedia of Food and Agricultural Ethics. http://www.springerreference.com/docs/html/chapterdbid/334988.html.

Commissioned Report for External Body

Dixon, L., Tumilty, E., Kensington, M., Campbell, N., Lennox, S., Calvert, S., Gray, E. & Pairman, S. (2014). Stepping forward into life as a midwife in New Zealand/Aotearoa: An analysis of the Midwifery First Year of Practice programme 2007 to 2010. Christchurch, New Zealand: New Zealand College of Midwives.

Conference Contribution - Abstract

Hayes, J, English, S, Grobler, C & Frampton, C (2014). Is extra corporeal shockwave lithotripsy more effective when conducted under general anaesthetic compared with conscious sedation? In BJUI (p. 6). Wiley Online Library.

Conference Contribution - Paper in published proceedings

Daellenbach, R., Davies, L., Kensington, M. & Tamblyn, R. (2014). Fostering online student interaction using the OB3 web application for online study. In B Hegarty & J. McDonald (Eds.). Rhetoric and Reality: Critical Perspectives on Educational Technology (pp. 570-573). Dunedin, New Zealand: ASCILITE.

Conference Contribution - Poster presentation

Gameln-Greene, R., Harding, J.S. & Hawke, D.J. (2014). Detecting marine subsidies in stream ecosystems. Presented at the 9th International Conference on the Applications of Stable Isotope Techniques to Ecological Studies, Perth, WA, Australia.

Hayes, J., Grobler, C & Frampton, C. (2014). Is extra corporeal shockwave lithotripsy more effective when conducted under general anaesthetic compared with conscious sedation? Presented at The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists, Australian Institute of Radiography, Australasian College of Physical Scientists & Engineers in Medicine - Combined Scientific Meeting, Melbourne, Australia.

Conference Contribution - Oral presentation

Marshall, H.C., Green, J., Calder, K., Wood, J., Vabulis, S., Reynolds, C., Blackwell, G., Wensley, L. & Draper, N. (2014). Physical activity support programme promotes sustained improvements in physical activity and markers of wellbeing: Review of the Green Prescription Programme in Canterbury, New Zealand. Presented at the Agencies for Nutrition Action, Christchurch Regional Forum, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Kensington, M., Campbell, N., Lennox, S., Pairman, S., Tumilty, E., Dixon, L., Calvert, S. & Gray, E. (2014). Midwifery first year of practice programme: Enhancing autonomy through support. Presented at the New Zealand College of Midwives (Inc.) 13th Biennial National Conference, Hamilton, New Zealand.

Kensington, M., Daellenbach, R. & Davies, L. (2014). Mind the gap: Integrating theory and practice within a blended learning midwifery curriculum. Presented at the International Confederation of Midwives (ICM) 30th Triennial Conference, Prague, Czech Republic.

Davies, L. & Daellenbach, R. (2014). The Paradox of Resilience. Presented at the Annual Conference of the Sociological Association of Aotearoa New Zealand, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Hayes, J., Grobler, C. & Frampton, C. (2014). Is extra corporeal shockwave lithotripsy more effective when conducted under general anaesthetic compared with conscious sedation? A retrospective review. Presented at the 18th ISRRT World Congress, Helsinki, Finland.

Edited Book

Davies, L. (Ed.). (2014). Nutrition in Pregnancy and Childbirth. New York, NY: Routledge.

Journal Article

Hawke, D. & Condron, L.M. (2014). Mobilisation of recalcitrant soil nutrient fractions supports foliar nitrogen to phosphorus homeostasis in a seabird soil. Plant and Soil, 385(1-2), 77-86.

Grigg, C., Tracy, S., Daellenbach, R., Kensington, M. & Schmied, V. (2014). An exploration of influences on women’s birthplace decision-making in New Zealand: a mixed methods prospective cohort within the Evaluating Maternity Units study. BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 14/210

Hamlin, M.J., Fraser, M., Lizamore, C.A., Draper, N., Blackwell, G. & Shearman, J. (2014). Effects of bioelectrical impedance-derived fat and lean mass on fitness levels in 8- to 13-year-old children. Asian Journal of Exercise & Sports Science, 11(1), 36-45.

Clark, J. (2014). New erythraeids (Parasitengona) from recent glacial outwash, Southern Alps, New Zealand; Callidosoma, Momorangia, Grandjeanella, and Pukakia gen. nov.; with a description of the deutonymph of Callidosoma tiki. International Journal of Acarology, 40(2), 174-204.

Davies, L. (2014). The impact of fear of childbirth on the relationship between a mother and her baby. International Journal of Birth and Parent Education, 1(2)

Lunt, H., Draper, N., Marshall, H.C., Logan, F.J., Hamlin, M.J., Shearman, J.P., Cotter, J.D., Kimber, N.E., Blackwell, G. & Frampton, C.M.A. (2014). High intensity interval training in a real world setting: A randomized controlled feasibility study in overweight inactive adults, measuring change in maximal oxygen intake. PLOS One, 9(1), 1-11.

Olsen, P., Elliott, J.M., Frampton, C. & Bradley, P.S. (2014). Winning or losing does matter: Acute cardiac admissions in New Zealand during Rugby World Cup tournaments. European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, Online 12 June.

Hamlin, M.J., Fraser, M., Lizamore, C.A., Draper, N., Shearman, J.P. & Kimber, N.E. (2014). Measurement of cardiorespiratory fitness in children from two commonly used field tests after accounting for body fatness and maturity. Journal of Human Kinetics, 40, 83-92.

Lunt, H, Draper, N., Marshall, H., Logan, F.J., Hamlin, M.J., Shearman, J.P., Cotter, J.D., Kimber, N.E., Blackwell, G. & Frampton, C.M.A. (2014). Correction: High intensity interval training in a real world setting: A randomized controlled feasibility study in overweight inactive adults, measuring change in maximal oxygen uptake. PLoS ONE, 9(3), e92651.

Authored Book

Parrino, R., Kidwell, D., Au Yong, H., Dempsey, M., Morkel-Kingsbury, N., Ekanayake, S., Kofoed, J, & Murray, J. (2014). Fundamentals of Corporate Finance. (2nd ed.). Milton, QLD, Australia: Wiley.

Chapter in book

Kahiya, E.T., Dean, D.L. & Heyl, J. (2014). The dynamic nature of the export development undertaking: Implications for researchers and practitioners. In C.C. Julian (Ed.). Research Handbook on Export Marketing (pp. 203-230). Cheltenham, Glos., England: Edward Elgar Publishing.

Conference Contribution - Conference Abstract

Pellegrino, J. & McNaughton, R.B. (2014). Learning in incrementally internationalizing SMEs. Presented at the McGill International Entrepreneurship Conference, Santiago, Chile.

Pellegrino, J., McNaughton, R.B. & Campbell-Hunt, C. (2014). Learning in rapidly- versus incrementally-internationalizing firms. Presented at the Australia and New Zealand International Business Academy Conference, Auckland, New Zealand.

Conference Contribution - Paper in published proceedings

Ishrat, S. I. & Keating, P. (2014). A Disruption Neighbourhood Approach to the Airline Schedule Recovery Problem. Proceedings of the International Conference on Mathematical Sciences and Applications, New Delhi, India.

Harris, H. & O'Sullivan, J. (2014). An investigation into the public identification of traditional Maori cultural values within Maori organisations and crown entities and their role in informing organisational practices and policies. Published in Proceedings of Australian & New Zealand Academy of Management. Retrieved from http://www.anzam.org/wp-content/uploads/pdf-manager/1740_ANZAM-2014-429.PDF

Conference Contribution - Oral Presentation

Harris, H. & O'Sullivan, J. (2014). The potential role of Kīorahi in Māori development. Presented at the International Indigenous Development Research Conference, Auckland, New Zealand.

Journal Article

Ainsworth, J. & Ballantine, P.W. (2014). That's different! How consumers respond to retail website change. Journal of Retailing and Consumer Services, 21(5), 764-772.

Wu, J, Habib, A & Weil, S. (2014). Audit Committee Members: What goes on behind closed doors? Australian Accounting Review, 24(4), 321-338.

Kahiya, E.T. & Dean, D.L. (2014). Export performance: multiple predictors and multiple measures approach. Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, 26(3), 378-407.

Mika, J.P. & O'Sullivan, J.G. (2014). A Māori approach to management: Contrasting traditional and modern Māori management practices in Aotearoa New Zealand. Journal of Management & Organization, 20(5), 648-670.

Department of Computing

Conference Contribution – Paper in published proceedings

Asgarkhani, M. & Shankararaman, V. (2014). Skills frameworks for industry and IT education alignment: A Pilot Study. In Proceedings of the International Conference on Teaching, Assessment and Learning for Engineering. Wellington, New Zealand: IEEE.

Proctor, M., Atkins, C., Mann, S., Smith, L., Smith, H., Trounson, R., Sutton, K., Benson, N., Dyke, S., McCarthy, C., Otto, M. & Nicoll, C. (2014). Exploring the application of agile principles to tertiary computing education. In M. Lopez and M. Verhaart (Eds.) Proceedings of ITx: New Zealand's Conference of IT (pp. 98-105). Hamilton, New Zealand: CITRENZ.

Robson, D. & Kennedy, D. (2014). Improving existing resources for interactive learning activities using tablets and touch screens. In B. Hegarty, J. McDonald, & S.-K. Loke (Eds.), Rhetoric and Reality: Critical perspectives on educational technology. Proceedings ascilite Dunedin 2014 (pp. 451-455).

Asgarkhani, M. & Clear, A. (2014). Techniques for aligning IT education with industry demand. In M. Lopez & M. Verhaart (Eds.). Proceedings of ITx: New Zealand's Conference of IT (pp. 35-39). Hamilton, New Zealand: CITRENZ.

Asgarkhani, M. (2014). Technology in learning: An overview of strategic parameters. In C-K, Li & T-W. Hung (Eds.). Proceedings of the e-Case & e-Tech International Conference (pp. 1197-1207).

McCarthy, D P. & Oliver, R. (2014). The game’s the thing: Levelling up from novice status. In M. Lopez & M. Verhaart (Eds.). Proceedings of ITx: New Zealand's Conference of IT (pp. 94-97). Hamilton, New Zealand: CITRENZ.

McCarthy, C. M. & McBrearty, B. (2014). Computer gaming and the positive effects on mental health. Poster In M. Lopez & M. Verhaart (Eds.). Poster paper in the Proceedings of ITx: New Zealand's Conference of IT (pp. 174-175). Hamilton, New Zealand: CITRENZ.

Department of Creative Industries

Book – Chapter

Wilkinson-Baker, V. & Malcolm, J. (2014). Television Journalism. In G. Hannis (Ed.). Intro: A beginner's guide to journalism in 21st century Aotearoa/New Zealand (pp. 268-281). Lower Hutt, New Zealand: The New Zealand Journalists Training Organisation.

Zanker, R. (2014). Yvonne Mackay. In B. Goldsmith, G. Lealand & M.D. Ryan (Eds.). The Directory of World Cinema: Australia & New Zealand (2nd ed.). Bristol, England: Intellect

Pauling, B. & Seel, P. B. (2014). Digital Television and Video. In J. H. Meadows & A. E. Grant (Eds.). Communications Technology Update and Fundamentals (14 ed., pp. 61-76). Burlington, Ma: Focal.

Pauling, B. (2014). Radio. In Te Ara - The Encyclopedia of New Zealand Wellington, New Zealand: Department of Internal Affairs.

Composition

Russell, B. (2014). No mean city. Christchurch, New Zealand: Installation in New Regent Street. Commissioned by Created for Audacious: Explore the city by ear. 1-2 Mar.

Russell, B (2014). No mean city (Escalier mix). San Francisco, CA, USA: L'esprit de l'escalier Records. 1 Aug.

Conference Contribution - Paper in published proceedings

Pauli, D. E. (2014). Climbing over fences: Transnational perspectives in the work of Mina Arndt. In K. Grant (Ed.). Inter-discipline: Art Association of Australia and New Zealand Conference 2013 — Conference Proceedings http://aaanz.info/aaanz-home/conferences/aaanz-inter-discipline-proceedings.

Conference contribution - Oral presentation

McCaffrey, T. (2014). How are we supposed to respond? The presence of performers perceived to have intellectual disabilities interrogating ethics and spectatorship in contemporary performance. Presented at the Theatre Performance Philosophy International Conference: Crossings and Transfers in Anglo-American Thought, Paris, France.

McCaffrey, T. (2014). From rearguard to avant-garde? Shifting perceptions of performance by people with intellectual disabilities. Presented at the Performance Studies International Conference PSi 20: Avant-Garde, Tradition, Community, Shanghai, China.

Reed, M. (2014). Kozo down under: Traditional and contemporary uses of paper mulberry in the South Pacific. Presented at the International Mokuhanga Conference, Tokyo, Japan.

Vavasour, K. A. (2014). The kids are not All Right. Presented at the International Association for the Study of Popular Music - Australia/New Zealand, Dunedin, New Zealand.

Vavasour, K. A. (2014). An earthquake walks into a bar.... Presented at the EMP Pop Conference, Seattle, WA.

Conference Contribution - Full conference paper

Ryan, L. (2014). The liquefaction of the creative class: Revisiting Florida in post-quake Christchurch. Presented at the International Association for the Study of Popular Music Conference, Dunedin, New Zealand

Ryan, L. (2014). We Gotta Get Out Of This Place: Revisiting meanings in the rise of rhythm‘n’blues in Christchurch 1964 - 1966. Paper presented at the Inaugural Music Educators Conference, Auckland, New Zealand.

Confidential Report for External Body

Pauling, B. (2014). Review of Otago Access Radio. Wellington: New Zealand On Air.

Zanker, R. (2014). A brief report on key public good research reports from a range of English speaking nations. Wellington: Commissioned by the Ministry of Culture and Heritage.

Pauling, B. (2014). Review of Radio Southland Access Radio Invercargill. Wellington: New Zealand On Air.

Exhibition

Reed, M., Yazzie, M., Quick to See Smith, Gumpper, J., Staikidis, K., Blume, C., Dalton, D., Dormer, J., Drost, L., Godollei, R., Loughridge, L., Miyoshi, K., Pearson, S., Polk, A., Resnik, M. & Salvator, M. (2014). Crossing Paths - Marks by a Select Group of Printmakers 2014. Boulder, CO. MoPrint 2014, Visual Art Centre.7-14 Mar. Curator: Melanie Yazzie.

Baldwin, K., Bohr, J., den Engelsen, J., Ettinger, C, Furusaka, H., Hey, H., Heyman, D., Kaca, D., Nam, Y., Pak, N., Pietzcker, E., Reed, M., Satake, H., Vollmer, A. & Zegrer, M. (2014). Snow. Tokyo, Japan. Tokyo Geijutsu Daigaku (Tokyo University of the Arts) Faculty of Fine Arts. 11-14 Sept. Curator: Pak, Nel.

McBride, C., Phillips, J., Meade, X., Mandelberg, J. & Reed, M. (2014). 4 x 3 Poster Project. Wintec, Hamilton. Ramp Gallery. 21 Jul – 1 Aug. Curator: McBride, C.

Maillard, J. P., Clark, W., Marshall, D. & Roberts, S. (2014). Ph4 An exhibition from four divergent photographers. Rangiora, New Zealand. Waimakariri public gallery, The Chamber Gallery. 28 Sept 2014 -30 Aug 2015. Curator: Hoult, B.

Dawe, B. (2014). Extant. A two person show with fellow artist Ben Reid. Christchurch, New Zealand. Chambers 241 Gallery. 20 – 31 May. Curator: W. Feeney

Maillard, J. P. (2014). Community Halls. Christchurch, New Zealand. CPIT Art Box. 3 – 24 Dec. Curators: Martin Trusttum & Grant Banbury.

Thomson, S. (2014). Wreath. Christchurch, New Zealand. Eastside Gallery. 3 – 14 Feb. Curator: Robyne Voyce

Aydemir, C., Barker, J., Bell, J., Hoffie, P., Jones, L., Keating, M. & Reed, M. (2014). Giving Voice/The Art of Dissent. Hobart, Tasmania, Australia. Long Gallery, Salamanca Arts Centre. 1 Aug. – 14 Sept. Curator: Yvonne Rees-Pagh

Reed, M., Stern, N. & Sredanovic, J. (2014). Critical Mass/Edge, 44 international artist print portfolio. Novi Sad, Serbia. Little Art Parlour Gallery. 30 Jan. – 14 Feb. Curator: Jelena Sredanovic; Grafički kolektiv, Belgrado, Serbia 4 – 16 Aug.; Fundación CIEC, Betanzos, A Coruña, Spain. May - June; GaleRica, Makarska, Croatia. May, Little Art Parlour Gallery, Cultural Center of Novi Sad, Serbia. 2 – 14 Feb; Proyecto ACE, Buenos Aires, Argentina, 30 Nov. 2013 – 24 Jan. 2014.

Journal Article

Pauling, B. & Reece, N. (2014). Against the Odds: Community Access Radio Broadcasting during the Canterbury Earthquakes: Some reflections on Plains FM 96.9. Media Studies Journal of Aotearoa/New Zealand, 14(1), 20-37.

Vavasour, K. A. (2014). www.useless.com: Crisis communications on shaky ground. Media Studies Journal of Aotearoa New Zealand, 14(1), 54-82.

Zanker, R. (2014). Heroic radio: A study of radio responses in the immediate aftermath of the September 4th 2010 earthquake in Christchurch New Zealand. New Zealand Journal of Media Studies,

Oral Presentation Non-conference

Maillard, J. P. (2014). John Maillard Landscape photography. Presented to the Workshop on landscape photography and extreme conditions, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Performance

Pearce, C., Marrett, R.W., Taitoko, S., Reynolds, G., Story, M., Moran, E. & Johnson, A. (2014). End of the rainbow. Christchurch, New Zealand. The Court Theatre. 1 - 22 Feb.

McKellar-Smith, S.M. (2014). Lungs by Duncan Macmillan. Dunedin, New Zealand. The Fortune Theatre. Director of New Zealand Premier. 23 Aug – 13 Sept.

Russell, B., Morley, M. & Yeats, R. (2014). Dead C in RIP society showcase. Sydney, NSW, Australia. Vivid Live Festival. Sydney Opera House. 23 May- 9 June.

Pickering, D, Taitoko, S.P., Kennedy, D., Pickard, R., Reynolds, G. & Genge, A. (2014). 'Jazz Crusaders' Headline Show. Nelson, New Zealand. Nelson School of Music. 4 Jan.

Pickering, D., Kennedy, D., Pickard, R., Genge, A., Taitoko, S., Reynolds, G. & Stewart, L. (2014). 'Oval Office in concert'. Nelson, New Zealand. DeVille & Washbourn Garden. 3 - 5 Jan.

Marrett, R.W. & Reynolds-Midgley, J. (2014). Songs that make you feel good. Christchurch, New Zealand. Music Centre of Christchurch. St. Augustine's Church. 7 Mar.

Marrett, R.W., Robertson, S.J., Story, M., Ferrar, M., Thomas, M., Oliver, H., Reynolds, G. & Pearce, C. (2014). Blood Brothers. Christchurch, New Zealand. The Court Theatre. 28 Jun – 2 Aug.

Marrett, R.W. & Harper, A. (2014). Concert Window - Ali Harper. via Christchurch, New Zealand. Ali-Cat Productions. World Wide Web. 27 Sept.

Pearce, C & Rainey, T (2014). Musical mentors concert series performance. Christchurch, New Zealand. Music Centre of Christchurch. St Augustine's Church. 23 May.

Whitaker, A., Reynolds, G., Taitoko, S., Pearce, C., Wells, C., Harrison, H., Bell, M. & Thompson, M. (2014). Rise up swinging. Christchurch, New Zealand. Cavell Leitch NZ Jazz and Blues Festival. Transitional Cathedral. 27 Apr.

Rainey, T. (2014). In the mood for love: Jennine Bailey in concert. Christchurch, New Zealand. Christchurch Symphony Orchestra. Transitional Cathedral. 26 Apr.

Pearce C.J., Rainey, T, Reynolds, G, Taitoko, S, Pickering, D, Harrison, H & Story, M. (2014). Symposium IV. Christchurch, New Zealand. Transitional Cathedral. 22 Apr.

Johnson, A.M. (2014). Souvenir. Dunedin, New Zealand. Fortune Theatre. 17 May – 7 Jun.

Pearce, C & Taitoko, S. (2014). La Boheme. Christchurch, New Zealand. New Zealand Opera. CBS Canterbury Arena. 15 – 18 Jul.

Pearce, C, Taitoko, S & Oliver, H. (2014). CSO Kids. Christchurch, Ashburton and Timaru, New Zealand. Christchurch Symphony Orchestra. Theatre Royal, Timaru and Ashburton Trust Event Centre. 15 Jul and 19 Jul.

Wagstaff, G., Taitoko, S., Reynolds, G. & Wells, C. (2014). The Glen Wagstaff Project. Christchurch, New Zealand. NG Gallery. 1 Apr.

Ryan, L. (2014). The Lizard Kings. Christchurch, New Zealand. The Christchurch International Jazz Festival. The Bedford. 25 Apr.

Ryan, L. (2014). Sharon O'Neil and The Sou'Westers in Concert. Nelson, New Zealand. Future Entertainment. Rutherford Hotel. 7 - 8 Nov.

Department of Engineering and Architectural Studies

Commissioned Report for External Body

Brown, C., Seville, E. & Vargo, J. (2014). Bay of Plenty Lifelines Group Resilience Benchmark Report. Christchurch, New Zealand: Resilient Organisations.

Conference Contribution - Paper in published proceedings

Harris, G., Pons, D. & Muir, L. (2014). A unique orbital IC engine, illustrating advantages of engineering to academia relationships. In the Proceedings of International Conference on Teaching Assessment, and Learning for Engineering. Wellington, New Zealand: IEEE.

Robson, D. & Kennedy, D. (2014). Improving existing resources for interactive learning activities using tablets and touch screens. In B. Hegarty, J. McDonald, & S.-K. Loke (Eds.), Rhetoric and Reality: Critical perspectives on educational technology. Proceedings ascilite Dunedin 2014 (pp. 451-455). Australasian Society for Computers in Learning in Tertiary Education.

Robson, D., Qi, Z. T., Louie, K. L., Hogan, D. & Cook, F. (2014). An industry oriented math teaching strategy for the Metro Group BEngTech program. In AAEE Conference Proceedings 2014. Melbourne, Australia: Australasian Association for Engineering Education.

Conference Contribution - Poster

Li, Y. (2014). Design and Implementation of a Generic Android Accessory Interface. In 21st Electronics New Zealand Conference (ENZCon14) Proceedings (pp. 139). University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand: Electronics New Zealand Inc.

Journal Article

King, A., Middleton, D., Brown, C., Johnston, D. & Johal, S. (2014). Insurance: Its role in recovery from the 2010–2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence. Earthquake Spectra, 30(1), 475-491.

Underwood, L. & Jermy, M.C. (2014). Determining optimal pacing strategy for the track cycling individual pursuit event with a fixed energy mathematical model. Sports Engineering, 17, 183-190.

Brown, C., Stevenson, J., Giovinazzi, S., Seville, E. & Vargo, J. (2014). Factors influencing impacts on and recovery trends of organisations: Evidence from the 2010/2011 Canterbury earthquakes. International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, doi:10.1016/j.ijdrr.2014.11.009

Li, Y. (2014). Development of an Android accessory interface to CPIT AVR training kits. World Transactions on Engineering and Technology Education, 12(3), 368-373.

Oral Presentation Non-conference

Seville, E., Brown C. (2014). Bay of Plenty Lifelines Group Resilience Benchmark Project. Presented to the Bay of Plenty and Waikato Lifelines Forum, Tauranga Yacht and Powerboat Club, Tauranga, New Zealand.

Cronje, T.F. (2014). New technology to treat cancer using high frequency and high voltage pulsing methods. Presented to the Nano Lab Users Group Meeting, University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Maples, D. (2014). Can a highly technical subject be delivered to remote students? Presented to the Bachelor of Engineering Technology tutors forum.

Maples, D. (2014). Can a laboratory experiment be delivered using Adobe Connect? Presented to the Bachelor of Engineering Technology tutors forum.

Working Paper (published)

Brown, C., Vargo, J., Seville, E. & Hatton, T. (2014). Cover Your Assets: A short guide on selecting and getting the best from your commercial insurance policy. New Zealand: Resilient Organisations.

Department of Food and Hospitality

Conference contribution - Oral presentation

Chan, S., Taylor, D., Cowan, L. & Davies, N. (2014). Deploying student / peer feed-back to improve the learning of skills and dispositions with video. Presented at the Sino-NZ VET Research Forum, Tianjin, Peoples Republic of China.

Department of Humanities

Awarded Doctoral Thesis

Straker, J. (2014). Meanings of 'the outdoors': Shaping outdoor education in Aotearoa New Zealand. University of Waikato, Hamilton, New Zealand.

Awarded Research Masters Thesis

Holmes, Y. (2014). Chronological evolution of the Urashima Tarō story and its interpretation. Victoria University of Wellington, Wellington, New Zealand.

Chapter in Book

Dofs, K. & Hobbs, M. (2014). Autonomous Learning Study Guides - useful tools in the self-access language learning environment. In J. Mynard & C. Ludwig (Eds.). Autonomy in Language Learning: Tools, tasks and environments. Canterbury, UK: IATEFL.

Composition

Waitoa, J. R. & Tana, J. (2014). Koukou mai te manu. Christchurch, New Zealand: Lincoln Events Centre. Commissioned by Nga Manu a Tane Cultural Group. 12 Apr.

Waitoa, J. R. & Karaka-Waitoa, A. T. (2014). He haka pohiri. Christchurch, New Zealand: Lincoln Events Centre. Commissioned by Nga Manu a Tane Culture Group. 12 Apr.

Waitoa, J. R. & Tana, J. (2014). Taku patu. Christchurch, New Zealand: Lincoln Events Centre. Commissioned by Nga Manu a Tane Cultural Group. 12 Apr..

Waitoa, H. and Hoskins, H. (2014). Haka. Composed for Paniora, a play by Briar Grace-Smith. Auckland, New Zealand. Auckland Theatre Company and The New Zealand Festival in association with Okareka Dance Company. World Premiere Soundings Theatre, Wellington, 26 Feb- 5 Mar; 20 Mar.- 12 Apr., The Maidment, Auckland, New Zealand.

Conference Contribution - Paper in published proceedings

Dofs, K. (2014). Autonomous study guides: Bridging classroom and self-access centre learning. In T. Pattison (Ed.). IATEFL 2013 Liverpool Conference Selections (pp. 138-140). Canterbury, UK: IATEFL.

Harris, H. & O'Sullivan, J. (2014). An investigation into the public identification of traditional Maori cultural values within Maori organisations and crown entities and their role in informing organisational practices and policies. Published in Proceedings of Australian & New Zealand Academy of Management. Retrieved from http://www.anzam.org/wp-content/uploads/pdf-manager/1740_ANZAM-2014-429.PDF

Conference Contribution - Oral presentation

Irwin, D. (2014). If the shoe fits: Student activism and identity. Presented at the New Zealand Association of Environmental Education Biennial Conference 2014. Christchurch, New Zealand.

Harris, H. & O'Sullivan, J. (2014). The potential role of Kīorahi in Māori development. Presented at the International Indigenous Development Research Conference, Auckland, New Zealand.

Dofs, K. (2014). Speaking practice in an Autonomous Learning Self Access Centre. Presented at the 14th National Conference for Community Languages and ESOL, Wellington, New Zealand.

Harris, H. (2014). Kīorahi kupu: The evolution of playing terms within the sport. Presented at the Learning and Teaching Languages Symposium, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Dofs, K.I. (2014). Activating learners through autonomous learning support. Presented at the Doing Research in Applied Linguistics 2 / Independent Learning Association Conference 2014, Bangkok, Thailand.

Dofs, K. & Hobbs, M (2014). Enhancing student success in a changing world: Autonomous learning guides for out‐of‐class learning. Presented at Association of Tertiary Learning Advisors of Aotearoa/New Zeland, Auckland, New Zealand.

Dofs, K.I. & Hobbs, M (2014). Essential advising to underpin effective language learning and teaching. Presented at the 14th National Conference for Community Languages and ESOL, Wellington, New Zealand.

Journal Article

Gawith, E. (2014). The New Zealand earthquakes and the role of schools in engaging children in emotional processing of disaster experiences. Pastoral Care in Education: An international Journal of Personal, Social and Emotional Development, 32(1), 54-67.

Department of Nursing and Human Services

Chapter in Book

Casey, M. & Sims, D. (2014). Dedicated Education Units: Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology and Canterbury District Health Board (CPIT/CDHB), New Zealand. In K. Edgecombe & M. Bowden (Eds.). Clinical Learning and Teaching Innovations in Nursing. Innovation and Change in Professional Education 10, (pp. 103-122). New York, NY: Springer.

Conference Contribution - Full conference paper

Davies, N. (2014). Perspectives of Loneliness. Presented at the Aging, Isolation and Inclusion session of the Aging and Society Fourth Interdisciplinary Conference, Manchester, England.

Conference Contribution - Other

Cook, D. A. & Casey, M. (2014). Canterbury DEUs strategies for success. Presented at the Portland Model DEU: A Journey to Future Possibilities, Portland, OR.

Conference Contribution - Oral presentation

Maidment, J., Campbell, A., Tudor, R.M. & Whittaker, K. (2014). Crafting Recovery: How domestic handcraft fosters wellbeing post-disaster. Presented at The Social Impact of the Canterbury Earthquakes, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Taua, C., Neville, C. & Scott, T. (2014). Capacity, information and voluntariness: The realities of gaining consent. Presented at the ASID Conference, Hamilton, New Zealand.

Chan, S., Taylor, D., Cowan, L. & Davies, N. (2014). Deploying student / peer feed-back to improve the learning of skills and dispositions with video. Presented at the Sino-NZ VET Research Forum, Tianjin, Peoples Republic of China.

Richardson, A.E., Richardson, S., Trip, H., Tabakakis, K., Josland, H., McKay, L., Hickmott, B., Dolan, B., Houston, G., Cowan, L. & Maskill, V. (2014). Disaster preparedness: Lessons from Christchurch earthquakes. Presented at the 25th International Networking for Healthcare Education Conference, Cambridge, England.

Tudor, R.M., Maidment, J., Campbell, A. & Whittaker, K. (2014). Using craft to foster community connectedness and resilience post disaster. Presented at the Joint World Conference on Social Work, Education and Social Development, Melbourne, Australia.

Richardson, A.E. & Yarwood, J. (2014). Public health nursing and expressions of culturally safe practice. Presented at the 25th International Networking for Healthcare Education Conference, Cambridge, England.

Journal Article

Taua, C., Neville, C. & Hepworth, J. (2014). Research participation by people with intellectual disability and mental health issues: An examination of the processes of consent. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing, 23(6), 513-524.

Watson, P.B., Seaton, P., Sims, D., Jamieson, I., Mountier, J., Whittle, R. & Saarikoski, M. (2014). Exploratory factor analysis of the clinical learning environment, Supervision and Nurses Teacher Scale (CLES+T). Journal of Nursing Measurement, 22(1), 164-180.

Oral Presentation Non-conference

Richardson, S., Josland, H., Cowan, L., Trip, H., Richardson, A. Dolan, B., McKay, L., Hickmott, B., Houston, G. & Tabakakis, K. (2014). Teaching and learning through the Christchurch earthquakes. Presented to the Psych Med Grand Rounds. University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Brokenshire, M., Josland, H. & Meeks, M. (2014). Why is IPE simulation important? The challenges and ideas for the future. Presented to the Canterbury Collaborative Simulation Interest Group, University of Otago Medical School, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Davies, N. (2014). Perspective of loneliness. Presented at CPIT Research Month, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Hughes, M.E (2014). Delegation and direction. Presented at study day at NZNO: Enrolled nursing, Christchurch, New Zealand.

Other Assessable Output

Bowen- Withington, J. (2014) Chapter 21 Breasts and the lymphatic system (editor). In P. Lewis & D. Foley. Health assessment in nursing (Australian & New Zealand 2nd ed., pp. 373- 390). Sydney, New South Wales, Australia: Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins.

Report – Technical

Jamieson, I, Sims, D, Casey, M, Osborne, R & Wilkinson, K. (2014). An exploration of the utilisation of the Canterbury Dedicated Education Unit model of clinical teaching and learning to support graduate registered nurses in their first year of practice. Report prepared for CDHB/CPIT Dedicated Education Unit Governance Group. Christchurch: CPIT.

Student Services

Chapter in Book

O'Regan, H. (2014). Community initiatives. In R. Higgins, P. Rewi & V. Olsen-Reeder (Eds.). The value of the Maori language: Te hua o te reo Maori (pp. 109-122). Wellington, New Zealand: Huia Publishers.

Conference Contribution - Paper in published proceedings

Cameron, C. & Catt, C. (2014). Learning centre practice in Aotearoa/New Zealand: Preliminary report. In H. Martin & M. Simkin (Eds.). Hikina te manuka!: Learning connections in a changing environment: Proceedings of the 2013 Annual International Conference of the Association of Tertiary Learning Advisors of Aotearoa/New Zealand (pp. 1-18). Napier, New Zealand: ATLAANZ.

Contribution to the Research Environment

Academic Devision

Facilitating networks

Chan, S. Peer review of papers for conference - Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association Conference.

Chan, S. Peer review papers for Ascilite conference.

Roche, L. Conference paper reviewer published in: H. Martin & M. Simkin (Eds.). Hikina te manuka: Learning connections in a changing environment. Vol. 9. Napier, New Zealand: ATLAANZ.

Department of Applied Sciences and Allied Health

Student Assistance

James Hayes Student received third place for research poster at the 2014 NZIMRT conference.

Department of Computing

Facilitating networks

Clear, A. Co Chair Computing and Information Technology Education and Research in NZ.

Clear, A. Working Group Chair Innovation and Technology in Computer Science Education, Uppsala, Sweden.

Department of Creative Industries

Membership of Research Collaborations and Consortia

Zanker, R. Invited to be part of the international research team. With Professor Judith Duncan Canterbury University, F. Namasinga, A. L. Lima, Kristin McGregor.

Department of Engineering and Architectural Studies

External Research Funding

Brown, C. Funding from University of Canterbury, $97,333.30 for contribution to Resilient Organisations research programme over a 15 month period.

Facilitating Networks

Brown, C. (2014). Part in establishing of a new organisation to link graduate researchers in resilient organisations.

Department of Humanities

Facilitating Networks

Irwin, D. (2014). Conference organising committee member for the New Zealand Association of Environmental Education Biennial conference.

Dofs, K. (2014). Invited to join academic committee for abstract and article selections, at King Mongkut's University of Technology in Thornbury, Thailand for the Doing Research in Applied Linguistics 2/Independent Learning Association Conference.

Dofs, K. (2014). Invited reviewer for ATLAANZ proceedings.

Dofs, K. (2014). Elected Co-convenor for Association Internationale de Linguistique Appliquée (International Association of Applied Linguistics).

Dofs, K. (2014). An endorsement for publication "Managing Self-access Language Learning".

Department of Nursing and Human Services

Facilitating Networks

Dean, J., Josland, H., Sheehan, D., Robertson, L., Beasley, C., Bielski, A. & Meeks, M. (2014). New Zealand Association for Simulation in Healthcare Organising Committee.

Jamieson, I. (2014). Invitation to speak at Nurse Entry to Practice New Zealand National Forum.

Taua, C (2014). Facilitating a visiting scholar, Associate Professor Christine Neville from The University of Queensland, as a speaker to New Zealand Schizophrenia Research Group.

Taua, C. (2014). Invited speaker Australasian Society for Intellectual Disability (QLD Branch).

Taua, C. (2014). Invited Member of the Round Table Discussion on 'Research involving participants with limited capacity for giving informed consent’ at the New Zealand Schizophrenia Research Group 21st Annual Meeting.

Peer Esteem

Academic

Appointments

Chan, S. Selection panel for NZ Tertiary Teaching Excellence Awards. Appointed by Ako Aotearoa Academy.

Chan, S. NZ Tertiary Teaching Excellence Awards Board. Selection panel for NZ Tertiary Teaching Excellence Awards. Appointed by Ako Aotearoa Academy.

Conference addresses

Chan, S. Learning a trade. Keynote at the National Tertiary Learning and Teaching Conference.

Chan, S. Flexible and Mobile Delivery @ CPIT post 2012 - Shaken, Stirred and Poured. Invitation to present keynote and workshop. National Tertiary Learning and Teaching Conference.

Other

Chan, S. Examiner for M Ed thesis - La Trobe University.A 'road map' to completion: the architecture, design and commitment towards the responsibilities of apprenticeship completion.

Editorial or refereeing

Chan, S. Peer reviewer for Vocations and Learning.

Chan, S. Peer reviewer for International Journal of Training Research.

Department of Applied Science and Allied Health

Editorial or refereeing

Hayes, J. (2014). Peer reviewer for Journal of Medical Radiation Sciences.

Department of Computing

Appointments

Asgarkhani, M. Invitation to be a keynote speaker at the HK IT.

Sarkar, A. Invited member of the programme committee for the 9th European Conference on Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

Department of Creative Industries

Favourable reviews

Taitoko, S. Review of "End of the rainbow" by Lindsay Clark on the New Zealand Theatre Review website.

Other

Marrett, R. Visit of John Bucchino (US music theatre composer) to Christchurch, 30 May - 5 June.

Zanker, R. Invited to mark doctoral thesis 'A face for Radio: On air presenting: On Air identity in Broadcasting’, University of South Australia.

Zanker, R. Jury member for judging children's and youth television awards and the Prix Jeunesse Special Prizes: 'Best 50 years in children's and Youth Media'.

Zanker, R. Invited judge for the international Prix Jeunesse children's media awards.

Zanker, R. Invited to judge awards for leadership training course by the Ethnic Affairs office in Christchurch for ethnic women.

Department of Engineering and Architectural Studies

Editorial or refereeing

Brown, C. (2014). Peer reviewer for Disaster Prevention & Management.

Other

Maples, D. (2014). Masters thesis examiner, University of Canterbury, Renewable Energy in the Kingdom of Tonga and the Implementation of 8kWp Photovoltaic Solar Energy Systems in Five Tongan High Schools.

Department of Humanities

Editorial or refereeing

Dofs, K. Reviewer for Palgrave Macmillan within the Autonomous Learning field.

Dofs, K. Reviewer for Journal of Academic Language and Learning.

Irwin, D. (2014). Editor of Out and About teachers journal (non peer reviewed) published by Education Outdoors New Zealand: Issue 29, Autumn.

Other

Dofs, K. Invited reviewer for e-press - Research with impact. Unitec, Auckland.

Dofs, K. Invited reviewer for the Association of Tertiary Learning Advisors of Aotearoa New Zealand proceedings.

Dofs, K. Endorsement for the publication "Managing Self-access Language Learning" by David Gardner and Lindsay Miller.

Department of Nursing and Human Services

Favourable citations

Jamieson, I. (2014). PhD findings cited in report prepared for the Ministry of Health, Health Workforce Board of New Zealand by the National Nursing Organisations.

Jamieson, I., Hale, J., Sims, D., Casey, M., Whittle, R. & Kilkenny, T. (2014). Report cited in Journal of Nursing Measurement.

Jamieson, I. Cited in text book, Clinical Learning and Teaching Innovations in Nursing: Dedicated Education Units Building a Better Future, edited by Kay Edgecombe and Margaret Bowden. Springer.

Jamieson, I., Hale, J., Sims, D., Casey, M., Whittle, R., & Kilkenny, T. (2008). Establishing Dedicated Education Units for undergraduate nursing students: Pilot project summation report. Christchurch, New Zealand: CPIT Publishing Unit. Cited in Journal of Nursing Measurement, 22 : 1.

Schluter J. Seaton P. Chaboyer W. (2008). Critical Incident Technique : A User's Guide For Nurse researchers. Journal of Advanced Nursing. 61, 1 : 107-114. Cited in 12 publications in 2014.

Chaboyer W. Wallis M. Duffield C. Courtney M. Seaton P. Holzhauser K. Schluter J. Bost N. (2008). A Comparison of Activities Undertaken by Enrolled and Registered Nurses on Medical Wards in Australia : An Observational Study (International Journal of Nursing Studies, 45, 9, 1274-1284.) Cited in 15 publications in 2014.

Creedy D. Mitchell M. Seaton P. Cooke M. Patterson E. Purcell C. Weeks P. (2007). Evaluating a Web-Enhanced Bachelor of Nursing Curriculum: Perspectives of Third-Year Students. Journal of Nursing Education. 46, 10: 460-487. Cited in 5 publications in 2014.

Editorial or Refereeing

Davies, N. (2014). International Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing (Reviewer).

Taua, C. Peer reviewer - Journal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing.

Other

Campbell, A. Reviewer for 3 chapters of Cultural Safety in Aotearoa New Zealand, Cambridge University Press.

Taua, C. Reviewer for textbook 'Core Interpersonal Skills for Health Professionals'.

Taua, C. Masters thesis examiner - University of Otago, Factors that influence the uptake and continuing practice of interpersonal psychotherapy by frontline clinicians following formal training.

Staff Prizes and Awards  

Staff Prizes and Awards  

CPIT Staff Awards

Rising Star Awards

Griffiths, Charlotte

Hoskins, Hemi

Connelly, Jan

Thomas, Natalie

Sustainability Awards

Meijer, Emma

The Sustainability & Outdoor Education Team: Irwin, Dave; Straker, Jo; Cory-Wright, Jean; Chapman, Steve; Atkinson, Mike; Heijnen, Ivor

Excellence in Management

Underhill, Bree

CPIT Teaching in Excellence Awards

For Recognition of Excellent Practice in Teaching and Learning

The Midwifery Team: Davies, Lorna; Daellenbach, Rea; Rowe-Jones, Hayley; Selwood, Caroline; Anderson, Jacqui; Pallet, Sarah; Kensington, Mary; Powell, Silke; Clarke, Amber; Richards, Julie; Welfare, Melanie; Martis, Ruth

Practitioner Award

The Next Step Centre Team: Ohs, Alison; Rose, Gillian; Moon, Julie; Downing, Lisa; Uta’i, Sam

Chief Executive Teaching Excellence Award

The Trades Engineering/Manufacturing Team: Smith, Tony; Harrison, Peter; Steerer, Bernie; Woods, Peter; Morgan, John

The First Line Management Team: Hodges, Nicky; Young, Toni; Verdellen, Jo; Sheppard, Susan; Hobson, Jane; Kermode, Vivienne

Other Awards

Asgarkhani, Mehdi

Recipient, IT Certified Professional (Strategy) Award, Institute of IT Professionals, NZ

Atkinson, Mike

Recipient, NZOIA Tall Totara Award for outstanding contribution to the outdoor instruction sector

Johnson, Angela

Recipient, Female Performer of the Year – Dunedin Theatre Awards.

Mechanical Engineering (General, Maintenance, Tool Making, Fitting & Turning, Precision, Diagnostics): Smith, Tony; Morgan, John; Streeter, Bernard; Harrison, Peter

Provider of the Year (Competenz Engineering) Team Award

Taua, Chris

Elizabeth Kenny Scholarship awarded by the School of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Queensland, Australia.

 

Student Prizes and Awards  

Student Prizes and Awards  

The following is a summary of significant student prizes and awards for 2014. Students are grouped under the Department in which they studied.

Eke Panuku CPIT Māori and Pasifika Department Awards

Foundation Awards

Beazley, Joseph (Certificate in Sports Training & Indigenous Culture Level 3 (Humanities))

Recipient, Foundation Award: Pasifika – Level 3

Carroll Rossiter, Aroha (Certificate in Pre Health and Science (Applied Sciences & Allied Health))

Recipient, Foundation Award: Māori – Level 3

Roberts, Lanessa (Certificate in Travel Operations L4 (Food & Hospitality))

Recipient, Foundation Award: Māori – Level 4

Monte Ohia Awards

Apiata, Te Ao Mārama (Jodi) (Diploma in Māori Studies (Te Hāpara) (Humanities))

Recipient, Monte Ohia Award: E Amo, E Rere – Level 5

Hayden, Shenaegh (Diploma in Information and Communications Technology (Computing))

Recipient, Monte Ohia Award: E Amo, E Rere – 1st Equal Level 6

Tweedie, Shelley (Bachelor of Midwifery (Applied Sciences & Allied Health))

Recipient, Monte Ohia Award: E Amo, E Rere – 1st Equal Level 6

Viliamu, Wira (Bachelor of Maori Language and Indigenous Studies (Te Ohoka) (Humanities))

Recipient, Monte Ohia Award: Bachelor of Maori Language and Indigenous Studies (Te Ohoka)E Amo, E Rere – Level 7

Supreme Awards

Bailey, Caitlin (Bachelor of Midwifery (Applied Sciences & Allied Health))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 2nd Equal

Bennie, Vanessa (Diploma in Professional Cookery (Food & Hospitality))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 1st

Brown, Tiare (Bachelor of Māori Language and Indigenous Studies (Te Ohoka(Humanities))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 1st Equal

Campbell, Harley (National Diploma in Quantity Surveying (Engineering & Architectural Studies))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Diploma Level

Campbell, Isaac (Certificate in Information and Communications Technology (Computing))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 1st

Dāvid, Titilupe (Bachelor of Nursing (Nursing & Human Services))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Pasifika – Overall 1st Equal

Davis, Casey (Bachelor of Maori Language and Indigenous Studies (Te Ohoka) (Humanities))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Bachelor of Maori Language and Indigenous Studies (Te Ohoka)Māori – Overall 1st Equal

Faau, Annette (Bachelor of Broadcasting Communications (Creative Industries))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Pasifika – Overall 1st Equal

Filimoehala, Antonio (Bachelor of Social Work (Nursing & Human Services))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Pasifika – Overall 1st Equal

Ford, Azure (Bachelor of Midwifery (Applied Sciences & Allied Health))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – 2nd Year

Fuimaono, Papaliitele (Certificate in Pretrade High Voltage Electricity Level 3 (Trades))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Pasifika – Overall 1st

Fuimaono, Tuvalu (Diploma in Business (Business))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Pasifika – Overall 1st

Godinet, Grace (Bachelor of Midwifery (Applied Sciences & Allied Health))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Pasifika – Overall 1st

Harding, Ashleigh (Bachelor of Midwifery (Applied Sciences & Allied Health))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 1st Equal

Kahura, Daniel (Bachelor of Applied Science (Applied Sciences & Allied Health))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 1st Equal

Kerr, Tāmara (Bachelor of Māori Language and Indigenous Studies (Te Ohoka) (Humanities))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 2nd Equal

Levey, James (National Diploma in Quantity Surveying (Engineering & Architectural Studies))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: National Diploma in Quantity Surveying Māori – Overall 1st

Luma, Asovale (Bachelor of Performing Arts (Creative Industries))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Bachelor of Performing Arts Pasifika – 2nd Year

Maru, Jonathan (Bachelor of Engineering Technology (Engineering & Architectural Studies))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 2nd Equal

Mihaka, Te Atatū (Bachelor of Nursing (Nursing & Human Services))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 1st Equal

Mulipola, Ana (Bachelor of Broadcasting Communications (Creative Industries))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Pasifika – Overall 1st Equal

Ofa, Richard Lisiate (Bachelor of Engineering Technology (Engineering & Architectural Studies))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Pasifika – Overall 1st

Olliver, Vanessa (Bachelor of Nursing (Nursing & Human Services))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – 1st Year

Pelenato, Viane (Diploma in Professional Cookery (Food & Hospitality))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Pasifika – Overall 1st

Reihana, Katie (Bachelor of Social Work (Nursing & Human Services))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 1st Equal

Ritchie, Renée (Bachelor of Midwifery (Applied Sciences & Allied Health))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 1st Equal

Robertson, Matthew (Bachelor of Engineering Technology (Engineering & Architectural Studies))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – 2nd Year

Russell, Jordan (New Zealand Diploma in Engineering (Engineering & Architectural Studies))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 2nd Equal

Scrimgeour, Alice (Bachelor of Nursing (Nursing & Human Services))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 2nd

Stone-Howard, Tūmanako (Bachelor of Midwifery (Applied Sciences & Allied Health))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 2nd Equal

Tatafu, Venly (Diploma in Professional Cookery (Food & Hospitality))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Pasifika – 2nd Year

Titheridge, Tane (Bachelor of Applied Management (Business))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – Overall 1st

Tooley, Ana (Certificate in Pre Trade High Voltage Electricity Level 3 (Trades))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Certificate in Pre Trade High Voltage Electricity Level 3 Māori – Overall 1st

Watts, Ana (Diploma in Enrolled Nursing (Nursing & Human Services))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Pasifika – Diploma 1st Year

Wicks, Andrea (Bachelor of Nursing (Nursing & Human Services))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Māori – 2nd Year

Winitana, Keiran (Bachelor Sustainability & Outdoor Education (Humanities))

Recipient, Supreme Student Award: Bachelor Sustainability & Outdoor Education Māori – Overall 2nd Equal

Te Puna Wānaka Foundation Awards

Bradley-Taurua, Alicia (Certificate in Sports Training & Indigenous Culture Level 3 (Humanities)

Recipient, Te Puna Wānaka Foundation Award

Daniels, Kuirangi (Te Haeata - Certificate in Māori Studies Level 3 (Humanities))

Recipient, Te Puna Wānaka Foundation Award

Edwards (Awa), Te Arohanui (Te Haeata - Certificate in Māori Studies Level 3 (Humanities))

Recipient, Te Puna Wānaka Foundation Award

Pasifika and He Toki Trades Special Awards

Pasifika Trades Training Foundation Awards

Fasi, So’a (Certificate in Carpentry Level 4 - Stage One)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in Carpentry Stage One

Fenika, Jerome (Certificate in Pre Trade Painting and Decorating Level 2)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in Paint and Decorating

Fetu, Tensing (Certificate in Carpentry Level 4 - Stage Three)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in Carpentry Stage Three

Fuimaono, Papali’itele (Certificate in Pre-Trade High Voltage Electricity Level 3)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in High Voltage Electricity

Fuimaono, Papali’itele (Overall Pasifika Trades Training Award for 2014)

Recipient, Special Award: Supreme Pasifika Trade Training Student of 2014 Award

Gluyas, Saulo (Certificate in Foundation Studies Level 3 – with specialisation option)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in Plasterboard

Tavo, Luke (Certificate in Foundation Studies Level 3 - with specialisation option)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in Essential Civil Skills.

Uili, Romani (Certificate in Carpentry Level 4 - Stage Two)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in Carpentry Stage Two

Māori Trades Training Foundation Awards

Drummond, Adam (Certificate in Furniture and Joinery Level 2)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in Furniture and Joinery

Hubert-Basset (Certificate in Foundation Studies Level 3 - with specialisation option)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in Plumbing

Kingi, Bobby-Joe (Certificate in Foundation Studies Level 3 - with specialisation option)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in Essential Civil Skills.

Murray, Andrew (Certificate in Pre Trade Painting and Decorating Level 2)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in Paint and Decorating

Palmer, Toby (Certificate in Carpentry Level 4 - Stage Two)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in Carpentry Stage Two

Pou, Anton (Certificate in Carpentry Level 4 - Stage Three)

Recipient, Special Award: Supreme He Toki Ki Te Rika student of 2014 Award

Pou, Anton (Overall He Toki Ki Te Rika Award for 2014)

Recipient, Special Award: Supreme He Toki Ki Te Rika student of 2014 Award

Ratana, Kristin (Certificate in Engineering - Fabrication Level 2)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in Fabrication

Tallot-Stuart, Semiko (Certificate in Carpentry Level 4 - Stage One)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in Carpentry Stage One

Te-Moana Williams, Lily (Certificate in Foundation Studies Level 3 – with specialisation option)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in Plasterboard

Tooley, Anastasia (Certificate in Pre-Trade High Voltage Electricity Level 3)

Recipient, Special Award: Top Student in High Voltage Electricity

Department of Applied Sciences & Allied Health

Bachelor of Applied Sciences (Laboratory Technology)

Hobson, Emilie

Recipient, New Zealand Institute of Chemistry (Canterbury Branch) Award for Best Level 7 Analytical Chemistry Student

Ng, Jermimah

Recipient, New Zealand Institute of Chemistry (Canterbury Branch) Award for Best Level 5 Analytical Chemistry Student

Weir, Hannah

Recipient, New Zealand Institute of Chemistry (Canterbury Branch) Award for Best Level 6 Analytical Chemistry Student

Bachelor of Applied Sciences (Physical Activity, Health and Wellness)

Roydhouse, Kirsten

Recipient, CPIT Degree Prize

Bachelor of Applied Sciences (Sport and Exercise)

Murray, David

Recipient, CPIT Degree Prize

National Certificate in Veterinary Nursing Level 5

Graham, Roberta

Joint Recipient, Merial Award for Best Overall Student

Prescott, Liz

Joint Recipient, Merial Award for Best Overall Student

Bachelor of Medical Imaging

Andrew, Megan

Recipient, CRG Award for Clinical Excellence Year 2
Recipient, High Achievement Award Year 2

Bradley, Danae

Recipient, Timaru Hospital Radiology Dept. Prize for Patient Care

Engel, Mary

Joint Recipient, Top Academic Student and NZIMRT Award Year 3

Flynn, Kerilee

Recipient, High Achievement Award Year 3

Gibbens, Grace

Joint Recipient, Radiographic Art Awards
Recipient, High Achievement Award Year 1

Hunnan-Pine, Alyesha

Joint Recipient, Timaru Hospital Radiology Department Prize for Patient Care

June, Stacey

Joint Recipient, Timaru Hospital Radiology Department Prize for Patient Care
Recipient, Top Academic Student and NZIMRT Award Year 2

Keyes, Sam

Joint Recipient, Timaru Hospital Radiology Department Prize for Patient Care

Lewis, Michelle

Joint Recipient, Top Academic Student and NZIMRT Award Year 3
Recipient, Carestream Health DUX Award

McKenna, Laura

Joint Recipient, Radiographic Art Awards

Nelis, Henri

Recipient, MMT Research Prize Year 3

Rathgen, Jessica

Recipient, Top Academic Student and NZIMRT Award Year 1

Sheldrake, Emily

Joint Recipient, Radiographic Art Awards

Waite, Jasmine

Recipient, BMI Award for Top Clinical Student Year 3

Department of Business

Crighton, Victoria

Recipient, Chunhi (Spring Sun) Scholarship
Recipient, Award for Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand Top 2nd Year Accounting Student

Dong, Jessie

Recipient, CPA Degree Practitioners Prize

Eccles, Holly

Recipient, Award for Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand Top 1st Year Accounting Student

Moody, Elin

Recipient, Award for Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand Top 1st Year Accounting Student

Pingyin, Luisa

Recipient, Award for Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand Top Accounting Degree Student

Department of Computing

McBrearty, Bernard

Awarded “Highly Commended” in the student poster competition at the ITx 2014 Conference, Auckland

Mudavanhu, Chiratidzo

Recipient, CITRENZ Top Student Award

Northcott, Catherine

Recipient, Jade Scholarship
Awarded Google Anita Borg Scholarship

Department of Creative Industries

Certificate in Fashion Technology & Design Level 4

Crisp, Caitlin

Ray Everett & Hawes and Freer Award for Highest Achiever

Diploma in Fashion Technology & Design Level 5

Brennan-Evans, Heather/p>

Ray Everett & Charles Parsons Award for Highest Achiever

Davies, Annie

Ray Everett & Charles Parsons Award for Highest Achiever

Davis, Cara

Levana Merino & Scorpio Books Award for Innovative Use of Merino Knit Fabric

Whelan, Kieran

Scorpio Books Award for Excellence in Digital Applications

Diploma in Fashion Technology & Design Level 7

Chang, Ethel

Highly Commended, Purfex Dressform & CPIT Industry Design Award

Flamank, Olivia

Sewingtime NZ Ltd Award for Highest Achiever

Weaver, Natalie

Winner, Purfex Dressform & CPIT Industry Design Award

Acknowledgements - 2014 Hokonui Fashion Design Awards

Bishop, Lydia

Menswear Award – Highly Commended

Brennan-Evans, Heather

Streetwear Award – Winner
Westpac Young Designer Award – Winner

Bachelor of Design

Griffiths, Isabella

Recipient, Noeline McElroy Staff Achievement Award

Horrell, Ashleigh

Highly Commended - Mortlock McCormack Art Award

How, Irenie

Highly Commended - Mortlock McCormack Art Award

Isbister, Lisa

Recipient, Noeline McElroy Staff Achievement Award

McEntyre, Tamatoa

Recipient, Bronze Award, Designers Institute of New Zealand Best Awards – Graphic Design

Nadarajah, Riva

Highly Commended - Mortlock McCormack Art Award

Ross, Holly

Finalist, Designers Institute of New Zealand, Best Awards - Graphic Design

Searle, Phillip

Recipient, Supreme Award, Mortlock McCormack Art Award

Snell, Jo

Recipient, William Cumming Award
Highly Commended - Mortlock McCormack Art Award

Diploma in Professional Photography

Abrams, Alica

Recipient, Bronze Award, Epson/NZIPP Iris Professional Photography Awards 2014

Blokhuis, Rebecca

Recipient, Bronze Award, Epson/NZIPP Iris Professional Photography Awards 2014

Chan, Centuri

Recipient, Bronze Award, Epson/NZIPP Iris Professional Photography Awards 2014

Hoare, Kate

Recipient, Bronze Award, Epson/NZIPP Iris Professional Photography Awards 2014

Hoskin, Aaron

Recipient, Bronze Award, Epson/NZIPP Iris Professional Photography Awards 2014

Saunders, Chelsea

Recipient, Silver Award, Epson/NZIPP Iris Professional Photography Awards 2014

Taniguchi, Tsumuki

Recipient, Silver Award, Epson/NZIPP Iris Professional Photography Awards 2014

Williams, Ruby

Recipient, Bronze Award, Epson/NZIPP Iris Professional Photography Awards 2014

New Zealand Broadcasting School

Burt, Georgia

Recipient, The NZME Award for Excellence (Radio)

Furley, Tom

Recipient, John Foy Memorial Award
Recipient, Ross Stevens Scholarship

Hogan, Sean

Recipient, Ross Stevens Scholarship

Howden, Luke

Johnston, James

Recipient, Neil Jenkins Award for Radio Creativity

McCulloch, Jared

Recipient, Jack Tame Prize

Murphy, Sally

Recipient, Ross Stevens Scholarship

Robertson, Sam

Recipient, Christian Broadcasting Association Scholarship

Twyman, Laura

Recipient, Christian Broadcasting Association Scholarship

Steele, Jasmine

Recipient, SKY Year One Digital Film and Television Production Top Student
Recipient, SKY Year One Digital Film and Television Outstanding Craft Achievement

Performing Arts

NASDA

Boyes, Brylee

Recipient, The Louise Clark Red Hot Singing Scholarship

Bachelor of Musical Arts

Burton, Marcus

Recipient, APRA On Song Songwriter Award

Hurley, Sarena

Recipient, Special Commendation APRA On Song Songwriter Award

Mayo, Lukas

Recipient, APRA On Song Songwriter Award

Waiiri, Caleb

Recipient, Alan Robinson Memorial Guitar Award

Department of Engineering & Architectural Studies

Bachelor of Architectural Studies

Carter, Michael

Recipient, NZIA Award - Year 3 Bachelor of Architectural Studies
Recipient, Warren and Mahoney Award - Year 3 Bachelor of Architectural Studies

Quinn, Michelle

Recipient, DINZ Award - Year 3 Bachelor of Architectural Studies

Ritchie, Gareth

Recipient, ADNZ Award - Year 3 Bachelor of Architectural Studies

National Diploma in Architectural Technology

Chisholm, Andrew

Recipient, New Zealand Institute of Building Southern Chapter Student Award for Excellence

National Diploma in Construction Management

Thompson, Marcus

Recipient, New Zealand Institute of Building Southern Chapter Student Award for Excellence

National Diploma in Quantity Surveying

Inglis, Olivia

Recipient, New Zealand Institute of Quantity Surveying Diploma Award

Walders, Stephen

Recipient, New Zealand Institute of Building Southern Chapter Student Award for Excellence

National Diploma in Interior Design

Barnes, Jacqueline

Recipient (Group Blue), The Drawing Room Award for Presentation Interior Design

Bedyn, Denise

Recipient (Group Orange), The CPIT Interior Design Tutors Award

Dempsey, Ingeborg

Recipient (Group Blue), The CPIT Interior Design Tutors Award

Doull, Lena

Recipient (Group Blue), The Resene Award for Excellence in Colour Interior Design

Hall, Jessica

Recipient (Group Orange), The CPIT Interior Design Tutors Award

Keast, Helen

Recipient (Group Orange), The Drawing Room Award for Presentation Interior Design

Murray, Katya

Recipient (Group Orange), The Resene Award for Excellence in Colour Interior Design

Walker, Edel

Recipient (Group Blue), The CPIT Interior Design Tutors Award

Department of Food & Hospitality

National Diploma in Hospitality Management Student Achievement Award of Excellence

Kay, Lucy

Winning Recipient

Kemp, Mikenzi

Highly Commended Runner-Up

Nestlé Toque d’Or

Silver Medal Kitchen

Silver Medal Front of House

Irvia, Amori

Murray, Pakitae

Tuck, Shannon

Karen Lewis Awards

Gada, Jacqui

Kampjes, Logan

Kay, Lucy

Kemp, Mikenzi

Schuster, Ofa

Youngson, Jesse

Southern Hospitality Student Scholarship

Mussen, Josh

Department of Humanities

Campbell, Sam (Next Step Centre for Women)

Recipient, Altrusa Scholarship

Pham Nguyen, Kha

Recipient, Barrie Frost Memorial Award for Top Student in MATH548

Lee, Hao Ming (Bachelor of Languages (Japanese))

3rd place Japanese Study Aotearoa New Zealand Japanese Language Speech Contest

McFadden, Craig (Bachelor of Languages (Japanese))

Recipient, Japanese Consul’s Prize for Top Year 2 Student (2014)

Jenkins, Ray (Mathematics)

Recipient, Alison Robinson Award 2014

Webster, Tane (Bachelor of Languages (Japanese))

1st place Japanese Study Aotearoa New Zealand Japanese Language Speech Contest

Te Puna Wānaka Recognition of Excellence Awards

Bradley Taurua, Alicia (Certificate in Sports Training & Indigenous Culture Level 3)

Recipient, Te Matataki Top Student

Brown, Charles (Te Hāpara, Bachelor of Māori Language and Indigenous Studies)

Recipient, Te Pae Tawhiti Top Student, 1st year

Davis, Casey (Te Ohoka, Bachelor of Māori Language and Indigenous Studies)

Recipient, Te Pae Tata Top Student, 3rd year

Edwards, Te Arohanui (Te Haeata, Certificate in Māori Foundation Studies Level 3)

Recipient, Te Aho Poupou Top Student

Emery, Dave (Te Ohoka, Bachelor of Māori Language and Indigenous Studies)

Recipient, Te Ahorewa, Te Puna Wānaka Most Improved Student

Luke, Christopher (Te Ata Hōu, Certificate in Māori Studies Level 4)

Recipient, Te Puna Wānaka Te Tohunga o te Manaaki
Recipient, Te Pūreirei Whakamatuataka Top Student

Skerrett-White, Haare Te Piki Kotuku (Te Atatū, Bachelor of Māori Language and Indigenous Studies)

Recipient, Te Pae Wawata Top Student 2nd year

Viliamu, William (Te Ohoka, Bachelor of Māori Language and Indigenous Studies)

Recipient, Te Taura Herenga Tangata

Department of Nursing & Human Services

Alizadah, Nida (Bachelor of Nursing)

Recipient, Pegasus Health Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Scholarship

Dāvid, Titilupe (Bachelor of Nursing)

Recipient, Pegasus Pacific Health Scholarship

Downie, Alice (Bachelor of Social Work)

Recipient, New Horizons for Women Trust Scholarship

Farrow, Hannah (Bachelor of Nursing)

Recipient, Frontier Medical Bachelor of Nursing Degree Award

George, Adebimpe (Bachelor of Nursing)

Recipient, Pegasus Health Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Scholarship

Kurene, Lurita (Bachelor of Nursing)

Recipient, Pegasus Pacific Health Scholarship

Lee, Inwha (Bachelor of Nursing)

Recipient, Pegasus Health Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Scholarship

MacFarlane, Sandra (Bachelor of Social Work)

Recipient, New Horizons for Women Trust Scholarship

McNoe, Shannon (Bachelor of Nursing)

Recipient, Pegasus Health Māori Pacific Health Award

Nand, Sumitika (Diploma in Enrolled Nursing)

Recipient, Pegasus Pacific Health Scholarship

Niida, Ai (Bachelor of Nursing)

Recipient, Pegasus Health Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Scholarship

Oyagawa, Caz (Diploma in Enrolled Nursing)

Recipient, Pegasus Pacific Health Scholarship

Paea, Valeti (Bachelor of Nursing)

Recipient, Pegasus Pacific Health Scholarship

Tuipulotu, Naomi (Bachelor of Nursing)

Recipient, Pegasus Pacific Health Scholarship

Williams, Tenisia (Bachelor of Social Work)

Recipient, Pegasus Pacific Health Scholarship

CPIT Trades

Archer, Shinay

Recipient, Apprentice of the Year Painting & Decorating

Berryman, Jamie

Recipient, ITAB Most Outstanding Display of Upcoming Ability

Child, Brodie

Recipient, Best Pre Trade Manufacturing

Coetzee, Shane

Recipient, Trainee of the Year - Joinery

Cole, Imche

Recipient, Apprentice of the Year Painting and Decorating Stage 3

Cummings, James

Recipient, Apprentice of the Year Automotive

Fairbrass, Cahn

Recipient, Apprentice of the Year – Autobody

Forest, Christopher

Recipient, Apprentice of the Year – Plumbing, Gasfitting & Drainlaying

Golley, Brendon

Recipient, Leadership in Autobody

Harding, Rebecca

Recipient, Most Improved – Plasterboard

Hendra, Hayley

Recipient, Leadership in Painting and Decorating

Hick, Steven

Recipient, Most Improved Plumbing, Gasfitting & Drainlaying

Huntley, Amelia

Recipient, Best Pre-Trade Plasterboard

Imanishi, Masahiro

Recipient, Leadership in Furniture & Joinery

Jackel, Stefan

Recipient, Most Promising Year 1 ITAB Apprentice

Kingi, Bobby-Joe

Recipient, Leadership in Civil

Lingard, Thomas

Recipient, Best High Voltage Electrical Student

Lowry, Janae

Recipient, Leadership in Plasterboard

Masiu, Ana

Recipient, Best Pre-Trade Painting and Decorating

McClimont, Abraham

Recipient, Most Improved Autobody

McDiarmid, Kim

Recipient, Best Pre Trade Civil

McIllroy, Sharesa

Recipient, Leadership in Automotive

McKeon, Joshua

Recipient, Best Pre Trade Plumbing, Gasfitting and Drainlaying

Recipient, Most Promising Year 2 ITaB Apprentice

Maclean, Joshua

Recipient, Leadership in Plumbing, Gasfitting & Drainlaying

McKerchar, Andrew

Recipient, Skills Organisation Plumbing Award

Neilson, Cheyanne

Recipient, Best Pre-Trade Autobody

Newell, Gregory

Recipient, Leadership in Plumbing, Gasfitting & Drainlaying

Ngahiwi, Steven

Recipient, Leadership in Carpentry

Parish, Ryan

Recipient, Sheldon Crawford Memorial Award

Pearson, Jaden

Recipient, Most Improved Carpentry

Pivac, Tomas

Recipient, Best Stage One Automotive

Ranson, Devon

Recipient, 3M Award for Excellence in Refinishing

Rawson, Nick

Recipient, Leadership in Manufacturing

Reynolds, Keryn

Recipient, Female Trade Student of the Year

Schofield, Cathie

Recipient, Most Improved Furniture & Joinery

Sheridan, Erica

Recipient, Best Pre Trade Carpentry

Slane, John

Recipient, Most Improved Manufacturing

Smith, Nigel

Recipient, Apprentice of the Year Electrical

Snelling, Fraser

Recipient, Most Promising ITAB Apprentice of the Year

Stevens, Aaron

Recipient, Most Promising Year 2 ITAB Apprentice

Strachan, Sarah

Recipient, Most Improved Welding and Fabrication

Thomas, Katie

Recipient, Leadership in Welding and Fabrication

Tihema, Harley

Recipient, Most Improved Civil

Tooley, Anastasia

Recipient, Best Pre-Trade Electrical

Toombs-Grieve, Andrew

Recipient, Apprentice of the Year Painting and Decorating – Stage 2

Tourell, Rochelle

Recipient, Most Improved Painting and Decorating

Van der Leij, Jesse

Recipient, Best Pre-Trade Furniture & Joinery

Van Groen, Robert

Recipient, Leadership in Electrical

Vance, Erin

Recipient, Most Improved Automotive

Varcoe, Ryan

Recipient, Best Pre-Trade Welding and Fabrication

Yu, Yohan

Recipient, Apprentice of the Year Automotive

Download Section

He Taukī Hua Mahi Statement of Service Performance

The purpose of the Statement of Service Performance (SSP) is to provide evidence of performance against non-financial targets. The measures selected attempt to provide a balanced picture of performance related to the four overall CPIT Strategic Plan Goals: Successful Graduate Outcomes; Responsive Stakeholder Partnerships; Targeting Equitable Outcomes and High Performing Organisation. The measures and targets are included in the Investment Plan negotiated with the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC). Thus these reflect the outputs expected of CPIT by the CPIT Council and TEC.

The SSP includes best estimates for student-related targets of course completion, qualification completion, progression and retention. The final Tertiary Education Commission (TEC) confirmed results are not generally known until mid-2015.

Goal 1: Successful Graduate Outcomes

CPIT's graduates will achieve sustainable career outcomes and be highly skilled and sought after by industry, community and business as a result of innovative teaching and learning practices.

  • Elizabeth Riach's startup My Killa Heels got a financial and mentoring boost when she won student entreprenureship competition Entre.
  • Graduate Alex Charlton is demi-chef de partie at Maze, a London-based Michelin star restaurant owned by well-known TV chef Gordon Ramsay.
  • Acclaimed New Zealand singer/songwriter Warren Maxwell was one of the industry heavyweights who inspired students this year.

EFTS (Equivalent Full Time Students) 

2014 Actual

2014 Target

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

Domestic (Student Achievement Component) EFTS targets achieved within the 3% tolerance band

5,375

5,575

5,412

5,156

International EFTS targets achieved

659

572


579

ITO (Industry Training Organisation) EFTS targets achieved

93

62


67

ACE (Adult and Community Education) EFTS targets achieved

87

93


88.7

Education Delivery

2014 Actual

2014 Target

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

Successful course completion rate for all students (SAC eligible EFTS)

82.6%

86.0%


82.6%

Successful course completion rate for all students (SAC eligible EFTS) at Levels 1 to 3

73.3%

77.0%


75.7%

Successful course completion rate for all students (SAC eligible EFTS) at Levels 4 and above

85.1%

88.0%


84.5%

Qualification completion rate for all students (SAC eligible EFTS)

68.0%

70.0%


73.4%

Qualification completion rate for all students (SAC eligible EFTS) at Levels 1 to 3

56.2%

60.0%


58.7%

Qualification completion rate for all students (SAC eligible EFTS) at Levels 4 and above

71.2%

77.0%


77.3%

Student retention rate for all students (SAC eligible student count)

65.1%

60.0%


65.9%

Student progression for students (SAC eligible student count) at Levels 1 to 3

37.9%

50.0%


39.6%

International

2014 Actual

2014 Target

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

Successful course completion rate for all international fee paying students (exclusive of ESOL (English for Speakers of Other Languages) students)

85.3%

83.0%


80.6%

Successful course completion rate for all international fee paying students (inclusive of ESOL students)

86.9%

84.0%


84.7%

Qualification completion rate for all international fee paying students

59.4%

87.0%


63.0%





Education Delivery

2014 Actual

2014 Target

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

Student satisfaction with effectiveness of teaching and assessment

80.0%

87.0%


86.6%

Quality and Outcomes

2014 Actual

2014 Target

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

Achieve organisation judgement of Highly Confident in both educational performance and capability in self-assessment in the next EER (External Evaluation and Review)

Not measured

Not measured


Not measured

Improve learner and stakeholder satisfaction ratings for programmes and activities matching needs

82.6% (students)

85.0% (students)


86.0% (students)

Improve learner satisfaction ratings for effectiveness of teaching

83.5%

80.0%


77.1%

Improve learners satisfaction ratings for guidance and support

72.8%

85.0%


76.8%





Stakeholder and Outcomes

2014 Actual

2014 Target

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

Establish baseline for the proportion of graduates who are in current employment related to their qualifications

82.0%



76.0%

Establish baseline for employer rating of value and satisfaction and set improvement targets for 2014 and 2015:





- CPIT graduates met employer expectations

76%



79%

- CPIT graduate ability to fit in at the workplace

70%



77%

- CPIT graduate ability to communicate

65%



77%

- CPIT graduates have the skills industry require

54%



74%

- CPIT graduate ability to work as part of a team

67%



72%

- CPIT graduates were work-ready

59%



62%

- The quality of CPIT Graduates soft skills

52%



62%

Note: This information was provided in the CPIT Reputation Research Survey of stakeholders undertaken in June 2013





Education Delivery: Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)

2014 Actual

2014 Target

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

Increase the proportion of SAC eligible EFTS enrolled at CPIT in STEM courses from the 2011 baseline of 17.6%

19.9%

19.0%


19.9%

Performance Overview and Evaluation

EFTS and Educational Performance

In 2014, CPIT delivered a total of 6,690 EFTS across all funding sources, and targeted increased enrolments to respond to the labour market demands of the rebuild and economic recovery of Christchurch and the Canterbury region. CPIT achieved growth targets in international and industry training EFTS, and achieved 99% of the revised SAC target. This was an excellent result and is reflective of CPIT's commitment to and engagement with its industries and communities. CPIT also built on its strong reputation as a quality provider of education and training for international students, exceeding its EFTS target by 15%. It is notable that since 2012, international enrolments have grown from 548 to 659 EFTS, showing steady recovery towards pre-earthquake levels.

The dynamic and changing rebuild environment required a responsive offering of programmes, particularly in the trades area. During 2014 CPIT continued to strengthen the support offered to apprentices and their employers in the construction, electrical and joinery trades.

During this year of growth, educational outcomes measured by course and qualification completion were maintained at or around the same level as the previous year. International course completion rates were particularly pleasing with a 5.8% increase in the non-ESOL course completion rate of international students, again reaching a level higher than domestic students. This improvement is evidence that CPIT's efforts in enhancing the support provided to international students is translating into higher academic achievement, which is particularly notable alongside the significant growth in international numbers.

Qualification completion rates declined between 2013 and 2014, likely due to the high demand for labour in the Canterbury region pulling people away from study prior to qualification completion, encouraging the switch from full-time to part-time study, and accelerating the move from foundation courses into apprenticeships.

Initiatives commenced in 2013 continued throughout 2014. Technology solutions to enhance student learning have been evaluated and are being implemented, e.g. lecture video capture, web-based content applications. The CPIT trades project to support increased demand from the rebuild and implement flexibility in delivery has progressed well. New learning spaces, and technology have been piloted, and enhancements to teaching and learning delivery implemented. 

Student retention rates once again exceeded the target. This is an excellent result given the strong employment market in Canterbury, and is reflective of CPIT's efforts in pastoral care and other student support. However, this has impacted on student progression in the lower levels off qualifications, with many students joining the workforce after obtaining Level 1-3 qualifications rather than continuing on to further study.


Quality and outcomes

In 2014 a revised Student Experience survey was implemented. This resulted in a slightly different question set to the indicators identified, and a significantly increased response rate. The new survey provides far more detailed analysis, leading to an improved ability to implement target responses. For 2015, some departments and programmes achieved at levels above the targets set, while in other areas strategies are being put in place to ensure targets are met for 2015. Due to the modified question set and significantly increased response rate, the results are largely incomparable between 2013 and 2014. 2014 results are to be used as a benchmark for future years. 

The 2014 Student Experience Survey had an overall response rate of 35.7%. The total number of student enrolments in the programmes selected for survey was 8,688, and the number of students who responded was 3,107.   


Stakeholder and outcomes

Between 2013 and 2014, there was a decline in measures relating to employer satisfaction with CPIT graduates. A key reason for this is assessed to be that, due to the high demands on the post-earthquake Canterbury economy, there is increasing pressure for graduates to be work-ready immediately on graduation. CPIT has identified this, and is increasing the number of CPIT programmes that incorporate workplace learning, as well as progressively modernising programme content and delivery methods in order to enhance the relevance of its delivery. CPIT has also identified the importance of developing core transferable skills for the workplace and is incorporating this into programmes of study.
 
Research conducted by an external provider has shown a slight decline in employers' perception of work-readiness. However this decline is consistent with findings from other work the organisation has completed in the tertiary sector, which suggests that this is a national trend among graduates, not institutions.

The 2014 Graduate Outcome Survey had an overall response rate of 31.8%. The total number of eligible graduates was 2,157 and 685 responded to the survey.   

Employer satisfaction data was provided by a survey conducted by Research First that was published on 17 October 2014. General public responses were from a telephone survey of 380 residents of Christchurch, and business responses were obtained from a stratified sample (based on CPIT's industries of interest) of 100 Christchurch businesses, who were also interviewed by phone.       


STEM

In 2014 CPIT continued to maintain the proportion of EFTS enrolled in STEM courses, exceeding the target. The employment of a STEM co-ordinator, new initiatives with local schools, holiday programmes and CPIT's commitment to the governments' Engineering Education to Employment strategy (E2E) have all contributed to growth in this area.

Download Section

He Taukī Hua Mahi Statement of Service Performance

Goal 2: Responsive Stakeholder Partnerships

CPIT's strategic partnerships will support sustainable practice and consolidate its position as the sector leader of skill based training essential to the recovery of Christchurch.

Business Development

2014 Actual

2014 Target

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

Income from "Fee for service" courses and activities delivered to meet identified needs

$2,454,337

$750,000


$1,868,543

Track courses that include Work Integrated Learning (WIL): work based delivery and/or assessment; establish an appropriate outcome related baseline and consider whether to set targets

48% of programmes have WIL

Improve on 2013 Baseline


42% of programmes have WIL

Improve ratings in Business Reputation Survey (including STEM industries as a focus group and establishing a baseline and improvement targets)

Very positive ratings achieved

Very positive ratings achieved


Very positive ratings achieved

Stakeholder and Outcomes

2014 Actual

2014 Target

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

Improve stakeholder (including students) satisfaction ratings as to the perceived value of outcomes.
Stakeholder and student satisfaction ratings are measured separately and are shown below.
Stakeholder Satisfaction:





- A qualification from CPIT is relevant to industry





  General public response

88%

85%


92%

  Business response

87%



90%

- This institution is the leader of the skill-based training essential to the recovery of Christchurch





  General public response

76%

85%


76%

  Business response

76%



73%

- This institution is leader of skills-based training in Christchurch





  General public response

74%

85%


70%

  Business response

82%



69%

- CPIT's qualifications meet the recovery and longer term needs of Canterbury





  General public response

76%

85%


80%

  Business response

76%



82%






Student satisfaction:





- Learners are satisfied with the value of outcomes

74.5%

85%


85.6%

Research and Knowledge Exchange

2014 Actual

2014 Target

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

Increase in number of projects with industry/stakeholder partners which have stakeholder engagement and align with CPIT strategy, TES (Tertiary Education Strategy) and other strategic drivers

45

30


29

10% increase in number of quality assured outputs that align with PBRF (Performance Based Research Fund) definition of research

146

220


179

International

2014 Actual

2014 Target

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

International income

$8.5m

$8m


$7.5m

Number of students on study visa / paying export education levy

1,214

1,260


1,119

Number of global multi partner relationships

3

1


3

Business Development

In 2014, CPIT's fee for service revenue grew by 31% to $2.4 million. This reflects the continued development of the Skills for Canterbury unit, which further expanded relationships with industry across the Canterbury region. CPIT also actively explored opportunities to provide flexible training to businesses, resulting in a number of short courses and training packages being delivered in 2014.

Fee for service courses delivered in 2014 ranged from 3-hour up-skilling and refresher sessions for industry through to 5-week transition programmes for Ministry of Social Development clients. An example of an innovative model of delivery is a partnership between CPIT and a Canterbury equipment supply company, with CPIT adding value to the firm through facilitating weekly up-skilling sessions for non-qualified staff in a mass-production factory. Construction and related skills are still key areas of training demand, although business acumen and efficiency are emerging as essential to a productive rebuild.

Following the 2013 establishment of a baseline for the proportion of CPIT's programmes that include work-integrated learning, in 2014 CPIT aimed to improve that measure. It achieved this, by increasing the proportion of programmes from 42% to 48%. 


Stakeholder Satisfaction

Between 2013 and 2014, measures relating to CPIT being the leader of skill-based training in Christchurch and in support of the recovery increased, however measures relating to qualification relevance decreased. This is linked to employer perceptions of CPIT graduates discussed above. While CPIT is progressively revising programmes and delivery models to match industry requirements, the speed of these changes is being challenged by the high demands for work-ready graduates and the changing workforce required post-earthquake Christchurch. The increase in measures relating to CPIT's role as a leader in the recovery and in Christchurch show that CPIT is adapting faster than other tertiary providers in the region to these requirements.

Due to the modified question set and significantly increased response rate in the student experience survey, the student satisfaction results are largely incomparable between 2013 and 2014. 2014 results are to be used as a benchmark for future years.  


Research and Knowledge Exchange

The number of projects that engage stakeholders and the community is increasing as CPIT's focuses more on applied research which is of benefit to the economy, and improves social, environmental and wellbeing outcomes. The number of these types of projects exceeding our target of 30. CPIT is also focussed on improving the quality of outputs and is reporting quality assured outputs. The number has not met the aspirational target however over the last three years the proportion of quality assured outputs has increased. These quality outputs generally require more resource and time to complete, impacting output totals.


International

The increase in international enrolments in 2014, 80 additional international EFTS and $1.1m revenue, was the result of continued development of international partnerships and active international marketing efforts. Key partnerships that contributed to this result were the Christchurch Educated initiative and collaboration with Education New Zealand.

Download Section

He Taukī Hua Mahi Statement of Service Performance

Goal 3: Targeting Equitable Outcomes

CPIT's empowerment of targeted priority communities will ensure they actively contribute to their communities' success, economic, social and environmental wellbeing through increased educational participation.

Student Support / Māori and Pasifika / Youth

2014 Actual

2014 Budget

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

Places provided in trades pathways for Māori and Pasifika students

78.3 EFTS

151.4 EFTS


Māori: 
154.9 EFTS

Pasifika:
48.7 EFTS

The proportion of SAC eligible EFTS enrolled at the TEO who are Māori at Levels 1 to 3

4%

3%


3.5%

The proportion of SAC eligible EFTS enrolled at the TEO who are Māori at Levels 4 and above

8.2%

6%


7.2%

The proportion of SAC eligible EFTS enrolled at the TEO who are Pacific Peoples at Levels 1 to 3

0.9%

0.5%


1.1%

The proportion of SAC eligible EFTS enrolled at the TEO who are Pacific Peoples at Levels 4 and above

2.6%

2.5%


2.4%

Successful course completion for Māori students (SAC eligible EFTS) at Levels 1 to 3

65.5%

70%


67.5%

Successful course completion for Māori students (SAC eligible EFTS) at Levels 4 and above

80.8%

85%


77.2%

Qualification completion for Māori students (SAC eligible EFTS) at Levels 1 to 3

43.6%

55%


46.7%

Qualification completion for Māori students (SAC eligible EFTS) at Levels 4 and above

50.1%

75%


72.2%

Successful course completion for Pasifika students (SAC eligible EFTS) at Levels 1 to 3

72.6%

65%


63.7%

Successful course completion for Pasifika students (SAC eligible EFTS) at Levels 4 and above

71.5%

80%


70.7%

Qualification completion for Pasifika students (SAC eligible EFTS) at Levels 1 to 3

47.4%

45%


41.5%

Qualification completion for Pasifika students (SAC eligible EFTS) at Levels 4 and above

42.8%

70%


66.9%

Improve Māori and Pasifika student satisfaction rates with learning services

M 81.6%

P 86.3%

85%


Not measured in 2013

The proportion of SAC eligible EFTS enrolled at the TEO who are aged under 25 at Levels 1 to 3

11.5%

12%


11.3%

The proportion of SAC eligible EFTS enrolled at the TEO who are aged under 25 at Levels 4 and above

49.7%

50%


50.0%

Successful course completion for students (SAC eligible EFTS) aged under 25 at Levels 1 to 3

69.6%

77%


72.1%

Successful course completion for students (SAC eligible EFTS) aged under 25 at Levels 4 and above

84.9%

88%


84.5%

Qualification completion for students (SAC eligible EFTS) aged under 25 at Levels 1 to 3

53.4%

55%


56.5%

Qualification completion for students (SAC eligible EFTS) aged under 25 at Levels 4 and above

65.5%

75%


70.0%

EFTS enrolled in collaborative transition pathways through targeted initiatives such as:





- Canterbury Tertiary College (CTC)

144

265


153

- Youth Guarantee (YG)

218

150

232

143

- Secondary Tertiary Alignment Resource (STAR)

13

8


8

The number of students participating in secondary/tertiary dual enrolment (CTC) courses

414

1,000

450

398

Student Support / Literacy

2014 Actual

2014 Target

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

Proportion of all Level 1 to 3 courses offered that contain embedded literacy and numeracy

95%

95%


100%

The proportion of EFTS assessed as requiring additional literacy and numeracy who are enrolled in Levels 1 to 3 provision and referred to Learning Services for additional support

100%

100%


100%

Evidence of progression for students having received additional support from Learning Services

Literacy 17.0% Numeracy 0%

55%


18.04%

Performance Overview and Evaluation

In the post-earthquake environment, CPIT has seized the opportunity for all groups in the community to participate in the future of Canterbury. In 2014, the institution committed to developing a new targeted approach to raising Māori student participation, retention and achievement, with the launch of the Māori Advancement Kaupapa. There was also significant investment in support for Māori and Pasifika students (such as the Centre for Māori and Pasifika Achievement [CMPA]). During 2014 the CPIT Youth Strategy was developed to support a coherent cross-institutional approach.

Māori and Pasifika

Through targeted recruitment and support initiatives CPIT has been successful in achieving its participation targets for Māori and Pasifika. 

The biggest growth in Māori participation rates has occurred within the targeted youth initiatives with 22% of the total CTC students identifying as Maori and 27.5% of Youth Guarantee funded places being Maori. Pasifika participation in CTC was also significant with a total of 8.5% of Pasifika of the total student group identifying as Pasifika, although this strong participation was not apparent in the Youth Guarantee numbers with only 2.4% identifying as Pasifika. A focus on progression strategies for Pasifika from CTC into Youth Guarantee programmes will take place in 2015 to address this issue. The high participation of Māori and Pasifika in the targeted youth initiatives is incredibly positive given the high employment opportunities for unskilled labour that exist in Canterbury at the moment, and the long term consequences for youth who do not achieve formal qualifications when the industry needs shift and more demand for skilled labour increases. We are therefore pleased that we are continuing to engage and grow such strong numbers for these key priority groups.

Whilst the total participation for Pasifika peoples enrolled in 2014 exceeded the target by 0.5%, the overall position did not increase from the 2013 position of 3.5%. Of particular concern, when these are broken down into participation levels, is the drop in participation in levels 1-3, as this will likely have a flow on effect for progression into the higher levels in 2015. A significant contributor to this decline for Levels 1-3 is the shortfall in expected enrolments through the Māori and Pasifika Trades Training initiatives, particularly among Pasifika.  As a response to this situation, a new recruitment initiative was launched in October 2014 using the No-Limits performing group to promote Pasifika Trades to communities throughout wider Canterbury. The Pasifika Trades Governance group was also strengthened to ensure a wider representation of the diversity of local Pasifika communities with the focus on increasing participation and retention in 2015.

The increase in part-time study options as a response to the buoyant Canterbury employment market has impacted on qualification completion within the academic year, particularly at Level 4.The modularisation of carpentry programmes continues to be a contributing factor to low qualification outcomes for both Māori and Pasifika trades students as they can enter the workforce after completing the first or second module, without having completed the full Level 4 qualification.    

Although participation targets have been met for Pasifika at Level 4 and above this remains an area that requires further development.  Targeted initiatives to promote non-traditional degree programmes to the Pasifika community will be implemented in 2015. 

The trends evident in the total student population are also apparent in the key target groups with Levels 1-3 showing slightly reduced participation and retention rates. These results are consistent with the high regional demand for unskilled labour and the decrease in participation and completion rates. 

Although participation levels for Pasifika in Levels 1-3 declined against the 2013 figures, the course completion results for those students in 2014 saw a positive shift to 72.6%, which is an 8.9% increase on the 2013 position of 63.7% course completion. Although the target of 80% successful course completion for Pasifika peoples Levels 4-7 was not achieved, there was a minor increase of 0.8% for this group.

To further provide direct support to Māori and Pasifika studying in the non-trade related programmes, a mentoring programme was developed and piloted in late 2014 with pleasing results, and this will be expanded into those high-risk programmes with lower Māori and Pasifika completions in 2015.

A number of departments identified the challenge of accessing timely and accurate data on Maori and Pasifika enrolments in 2015 and a lack of consistent strategies to engage students so that appropriate support could be facillitated. The Office of the Kaiārahi has been working alongside the records team to develop appropriate ways of capturing the required information to better support departments in engaging their Māori and Pasifika students. This is still an area that requires further development for 2015 to ensure all tutors across the institution have access to Māori and Pasifika enrolment information and appropriate engagement strategies to contribute to Māori and Pasifika engagement and achievement. This will, in part, be supported by the expectation in 2015 that all staff will have embarked on the E Amo, E Rere self assessment tool aimed at increasing responsiveness to Māori.

In 2014 there was a significant focus on strengthening the work readiness programme for Maori and Pasifika students which is an additional module to their programme that supports the development of soft-skills and employment focused activities, and this has resulted in positive results. A student transition programme was developed and implemented in 2014 for the Maori and Pasifika trades initiatives in association with the iwi and industry partnerships. The capture of the transition data for these student cohorts from 2013 and 2014 allowed for a higher level of analysis to take place, and these results showed a high correlation between successful graduate employment and the place of work experience, with 42% of students who engaged in work experience being offered employment in the area of their placement. This information is being used to promote the value of work experience opportunities to students and industry to support ongoing growth into 2015.

CPIT will continue to look for opportunities for these groups to continue learning while in employment, to ensure sustainable, meaningful employment opportunities in the future.  


Youth

A highlight for CPIT has been the year on year growth in targeted youth initiatives with an increase in participation of 71 EFTS from 2013 to 2014. 

Increased support has led to a slight increase in course completion rates at Levels 4-7, although this has not translated to an increase in qualification completion. A buoyant Canterbury employment market is attractive to students and CPIT is looking at ways for students to continue learning while in work, and at strengthening retention and support strategies in the classroom.

In 2014 the Canterbury Tertiary College increased engagement with a number of new schools participating from across Canterbury. This resulted in an increase of 18 students (4%) on 2013 enrolments. 

CPIT negotiated an additional allocation of Youth Guarantee places for delivery in 2014. This was in response to continued strong demand from students for this funding option. This meant CPIT was able to enrol an additional 75 EFTS.


Literacy and Numeracy

To improve in this area, during 2014 CPIT focussed on establishing processes to better determine students' literacy and numeracy abilities at the beginning of their programme of study; to assess the improvement in their literacy and numeracy skills whilst at CPIT; and to further develop CPIT's capability to deliver literacy and numeracy education to learners.

In 2014 the continued low levels of evidenced literacy and numeracy progression was a direct result of low numbers of students completing a best-effort Literacy and Numeracy for Adults Assessment Tool (LNAAT) assessment at the end of their programme. Uptake of this second assessment has been a continual challenge so during the second half of 2014 CPIT developed processes to improve assessment uptake, which in turn provides rich diagnostic data allowing support to be focussed where required.

As these processes were only initiated in late 2014 they did not have an impact on the overall 2014 literacy and numeracy progression rates.

Download Section

He Taukī Hua Mahi Statement of Service Performance

Goal 4: High Performing Organisation

CPIT will be recognised as a high performing organisation by operating as a responsive, progressive and sustainable vocational education training provider.

Workforce

2014 Actual

2014 Budget

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

Achieve tutor/student ratio

1:16.5

1:16


1:17

Staffing budget is less than 60% of total income

60%

60%


58%

Rating achieved in benchmarked culture survey in each of the categories of: vision, performance, developing people, collaboration, management, leadership

Changed survey

>4.0


Changed survey

Capital Asset Management System (CAMS) Environment

2014 Actual

2014 Target

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

CPIT carbon footprint and baseline identified, and improvement strategies and targets to reduce carbon footprint implemented

3,103 tonnes CO2

< 2,861 tonnes CO2


2,861 tonnes CO2

Financial

2014 Actual

2014 Target

TEC Revised Target

2013 Actual

Achieve TEO risk rating against the Financial Monitoring Framework (using the Tertiary Education Institutional Financial monitoring or TEIFM assessment criteria)

Low

Low


Low

Achieve operating surplus in 4-6% range

6.0%

4% to 6%


9.3%

Achieve validation of ongoing effective management of risk through annual internal audit against the Risk Management framework and effectively address any issues identified

100% 

100% 


100% 

Performance Overview and Evaluation

Workforce

CPIT continues to recognise that staff culture and satisfaction is a significant factor contributing to organisational success. The culture survey tool for benchmarking performance established in 2013 has been run again in 2014. The survey was split into 14 sections with approximately 4-5 questions per section. The scores for the key sections identified are below. These are the weighted mean score of all respondents – i.e. this was calculated based on the percentage of staff supporting the question by responding on the agreement side of the continuum. A score of 70% represents a 70% positive response.

1. Common Purpose – 70.4% (70.3% 2013)

  • Staff rated their sense of having a common goal within the organisation and an understanding of how their role contributes to those goals.

2. Quality and Performance Focus – 68.7% (67.8% 2013)

  • Staff rated the expectation of high standards of performance from staff and whether the organisation delivers high standards to its customers.

3. Communication and Cooperation – 61.5% (59.3% 2013)

  • Staff rated communication from the organisation to staff and vice versa; and the sharing of knowledge and information between teams in the organisation.

4. Wellbeing – 64.4% (63.5% 2013)

  • Staff rated levels of work-related stress, work-life balance and whether they believe employees are treated fairly within the organisation.

5. The person I report to – 78.9% (78.6% 2013)

  • Staff rated communication of goals and objectives, encouragement provided and that the person they report to treats people with respect.

Overall the survey results are pleasing across all areas, and show some progress in terms of the 2013 benchmark levels established. Similar progress is seen when looking at the benchmark organisation groups. The continuing score levels in 'common purpose', 'quality and performance focus' and 'the person I report to' support the view that CPIT is growing a culture of goal-oriented, unified performance with strong teams. The improvement in scores reported for 'communication and cooperation' and 'wellbeing' suggest that the additional effort in those areas, particularly organisation-wide communication and wellbeing initiatives, is having the desired effect. The survey results have been considered by all teams across CPIT and for 2014/2015 action plans. These plans focus on areas identified from the results as needing improvement, and have been agreed by the leadership team. Leadership teams across the organisation are expected to monitor the implementation of their action plans and to report back to Te Kahui Manukura on their progress.

*Staff culture data was provided from the IBM (prev. Kenexa) NZ Workplace Survey, for which CPIT had an overall response rate of 73.4% in 2014. The total number of employees who received the survey was 1026, and the number of employees who responded was 754.

Carbon Footprint

CPIT's carbon footprint measure is based on a calculation of carbon emissions arising from vehicle fuel usage, HVAC use, land and air travel and waste materials to landfill. The 2014 figure of 3,103 tonnes is 8.5% higher than the 2013 level, but still below the 2012 level of 3,134 tonnes. Between 2013 and 2014, there was a reduction in landfill waste, but an increase in the carbon footprint relating to facilities-related pollution, air travel, and vehicle use. Key contributing factors were likely to be increasing staff and student numbers, as well as significant facilities development work. The reduction in landfill waste shows that campus-wide initiatives around recycling and waste management have been a success.

In 2014, the CPIT Council set aspirations, goals and processes for embedding sustainable practice across organisation, to be achieved through the establishment of a cross-institutional sustainability implementation team. All aspects of sustainability: financial, compliance, environmental and social, are incorporated and aligned with CPIT's strategic plan.

Projects underway in 2014 include:

  • A review of the supply chain and procurement policy, incorporating supply chain accountability, alignment and behaviour change
  • Identifying environmental measures to improve management and use of resources
  • Auditing waste to landfill
  • Effective measurement of social data to provide baseline measures for social equity, equal opportunity and social justice
  • Green build and green organisation alignment through the Campus Masterplan process
  • Implementation of a sustainability Infoweb page in order to communicate to sustainability aspirations and activities across the organisation
  • Establishment of Student Voice to communicate CPIT's student body views, aspirations and goals for sustainability in their learning environment
  • A review of CPIT policies to reflect CPIT's sustainability aspirations
  • The Early Learning Centre commenced a process of embedding sustainable practice in all aspects of their planning

Further areas identified for development in 2015 include:

  • Embedding sustainable practice in learning and teaching
  • Developing staff capability in sustainability
  • Exploring opportunities for diversified income and commercialisation of CPIT's sustainability initiatives
  • Further collaboration across the tertiary sector, industry and community both regionally and globally in order to achieve CPIT's sustainability aspirations


Financial

CPIT is measured for financial sustainability and risk against a framework put in place by the Tertiary Education Commission. CPIT has a target of retaining its low risk status when measured under this framework. For 2014, using this framework, CPIT was assessed as being a "low risk" tertiary institution.

The operating surplus % is calculated before earthquake related proceeds and expenditure are taken into account. CPIT posted a strong operating surplus for the year at 6.0%, which is consistent with the budget target of 4% to 6%. An operating surplus of +6% scores a low risk assessment on this measure.

Tuition income was in line with budget expectations due to the government funding guarantee being in place and some additional unbudgeted funding streams for Youth Guarantee and specific additional funding for students under 25 years. Domestic fees income was below budget target due to slightly lower student numbers than expected. This was offset by strong international fees income.

Overall, educational delivery income was in line with budget while other sources of income out-performed budget. Non-educational income exceeded budget in the following areas: facilities hire, research grants, radio advertising, restaurant revenue and income on investments. 

Employee benefit expenditure has grown from 2013, but was in line with 2014 budget expectations. General operating expenses were lower than budget, primarily within the teaching departments. Lower insurance costs than anticipated resulted in occupancy costs also being under budget. Depreciation was over target due to higher levels of computer leasing and increased depreciation on a building (C block) as a result of a reduction to its expected useful life.

The surplus including abnormal items was considerably below budget due to the net impact of earthquake related repairs and insurance only representing work completed as at year end.

The CPIT Risk Management framework is embedded across the organisation and is reviewed at least quarterly by the CPIT Council and Management Team. All risks are ranked and prioritised based on impact and probability of occurrence. Risk owners are identified and mitigation strategies are documented and reported on to Governance and Management. For further verification, the CPIT Risk Management process is regularly reviewed as part of the internal audit programme.

Download Section

Kā Pūroko Pūtea Financial Statements

Statement of Responsibility  

Statement of Responsibility  

The Christchurch Polytechnic Institute of Technology hereby certifies that:

  1. It has been responsible for the preparation of these financial statements and judgements used therein; and
  2. It has been responsible for establishing and maintaining a system of internal control designed to provide reasonable assurance as to the integrity and reliability of financial reporting; and
  3. It is of the opinion that these Financial Statements and Statement of Service Performance fairly reflect the financial position and operations of this institution for the year ended 31 December 2014.

The financial statements were authorised for issue by the CPIT Council on 28 April 2015.

Jenn Bestwick
Chair of Council
David Halstead
Chair of Audit Committee and Council Member
Kay Giles
Chief Executive
Darren J Mitchell
Chief Financial Officer and Director of Corporate Services

 

Statement of Accounting Policies  

Statement of Accounting Policies  

Reporting Entity

The financial statements of CPIT for the year ended 31 December 2014 were authorised for issue by the Chair of Council and the Chief Executive in accordance with the Education Act 1989 section 220.2AA on 28 April 2015.

CPIT (“the Parent”) is a Crown Entity and is established under the Education Act 1989 as a public tertiary institution. It provides full time and part time tertiary education in New Zealand.

The CPIT Group (“the Group”) includes CPIT, CPIT Holdings Ltd, Christchurch Polytechnic Foundation and the Ōtautahi Education Development Trust (OEDT).

CPIT is a public benefit entity for the purpose of complying with generally accepted accounting practice in New Zealand.

Summary of Significant Accounting Policies

1 Basis of Preparation

The financial statements have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting practice in New Zealand and the requirements of the Public Finance Act 1989, Crown Entities Act 2004 and the Education Act 1989.

The financial statements have also been prepared on a historical cost basis, except for land and buildings and certain financial instruments that have been measured at fair value.

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with New Zealand International Financial Reporting Standards (NZ IFRS) requires management to make judgements, estimates and assumptions that affect the application of policies and reported amounts of assets and liabilities, income and expenses. The estimates and associated assumptions are based on historical experience and various other factors that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances, the results of which form the basis of making the judgements about carrying values of assets and liabilities that are not readily apparent from other sources. Actual results may differ from these estimates.

The estimates and underlying assumptions are reviewed on an ongoing basis. Revisions to accounting estimates are recognised in the period in which the estimate is revised if the revision affects only that period or in the period of the revision and future periods if the revision affects both current and future periods.

Judgements made by management in the application of International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) that have significant effect on the financial statements and estimates with a significant risk of material adjustment in the next year are discussed in the notes to the financial statements.

Except where otherwise stated, the financial statements are presented in New Zealand dollars and all values are rounded to the nearest thousand dollars ($000).

The accounting policies set out below have been applied consistently to all periods presented in these consolidated financial statements.

2 Statement of Compliance

The financial statements comply with applicable financial reporting standards, which include New Zealand equivalents to International Financial Reporting Standards (NZ IFRS).

3 Changes in Accounting Policies

There have been no changes in accounting policies during the financial year.

4 Basis of Consolidation

The consolidated financial statements comprise the financial statements of CPIT and its subsidiaries as at 31 December each year.

The financial statements of subsidiaries are prepared for the same reporting period as the Parent using consistent accounting policies.

Subsidiaries are entities that are controlled, either directly or indirectly, by the Parent. Associates are entities in which the Parent, either directly or indirectly, has a significant but not controlling interest. Subsidiaries are consolidated by aggregating like items of assets, liabilities, revenues, expenses and cash flows on a line-by-line basis. All inter-entity balances and transactions, including unrealised profits arising from intra-group transactions, have been eliminated in full. Unrealised losses are eliminated unless costs cannot be recovered. The results of associates' are incorporated into the financial statements by recognising a share of the associates' post acquisition earnings in the Statement of Financial Performance, and a share of the associates' post acquisition changes in net assets in the Statement of Changes in Equity.

The results of CPIT, CPIT Holdings Ltd, Christchurch Polytechnic Foundation and the Ōtautahi Education Development Trust have been consolidated into CPIT’s financial statements for the year ended 31 December 2014.

Subsidiaries are consolidated from the date on which control is transferred to the Group and cease to be consolidated from the date on which control is transferred out of the Group. Where there is loss of control of a subsidiary, the consolidated financial statements include the results for the part of the reporting year during which CPIT has control.

5 Revenue

Revenue is recognised to the extent that it is probable that the economic benefits will flow to the Group and the revenue can be reliably measured. The following specific recognition criteria must also be met before revenue is recognised:

Government Grants

Government grants are recognised when eligibility to receive the grant has been established and it is recognised over the period in which the course is taught by reference to the stage of completion of the course as at the balance sheet date.

Stage of completion is measured by reference to the months of course completed as a percentage of total months for each course.

Where funds have been received but not earned at balance date a revenue in advance liability is recognised.

Student Tuition Fees

Revenue from student tuition fees is recognised over the period in which the course is taught by reference to the stage of completion of the course as at the balance sheet date.

Stage of completion is measured by reference to the months of course completed as a percentage of total months for each course.

Where funds have been received but not earned at balance date a revenue in advance liability is recognised.

Sale of Materials

Revenue is recognised when the significant risk and rewards of ownership have passed to the buyer and can be measured reliably.

Interest

Revenue is recognised as the interest accrues (using the effective interest method which is the rate that exactly discounts estimated future cash receipts through the expected life of the financial instrument) to the net carrying amount of the financial asset.

Insurance Recoveries

Insurance recoveries are recognised in the financial statements when received or when it is probable or virtually certain that they will be received under the insurance contracts in place and can be reliably measured.

6 Property, Plant and Equipment

Land and buildings held under Crown title have been included in the financial statements. The CPIT Council is of the opinion that although formal legal transfer of title for land and buildings owned by the Crown has not occurred it has in substance assumed all the normal risks associated with ownership and accordingly it would be misleading to exclude these assets from the financial statements.

The measurement basis used for determining the gross carrying amount for each class of assets is as follows:

  • Land and buildings are measured at fair value less subsequent accumulated depreciation and subsequent accumulated impairment losses. Land and buildings are revalued every three years.
  • All Parent land and buildings were revalued as at 31 December 2014 in accordance with NZIAS-16. The valuation was completed by independent valuers: Andrew Parkyn BCom (VPM), PG Dip Com (Marketing), SPINZ, ANZIV, Vanesa Griffiths BCom (VPM), MPINZ and Brendon Bodger BCom, (VPM), SPINZ, ANZIV all Registered Valuers of Quotable Value. The valuation of buildings is completed to a component level on a market value basis where practical. Where market based evidence is insufficient, buildings are valued on an optimised depreciated replacement cost basis.
  • Land and buildings held under the Christchurch Polytechnic Foundation were revalued as at 31 December 2014 in accordance with NZIAS-16. The valuation was completed by independent valuer Ryan Teear BCom (VPM); MNZIV, MPINZ of Colliers International.
  • Land and buildings held under the Ōtautahi Education Development Trust were revalued as at 31 December 2014 in accordance with NZIAS-16. The valuation was completed by independent valuer Mark Dunbar Bcom (VPM), ANZIV, SPINZ, AREINZ of Telfer Young.
  • Leasehold improvements, plant and equipment, motor vehicles, computer software and computer hardware are stated at cost less accumulated depreciation and any accumulated impairment in value.
  • The Library resources have been valued by B Roberts of DTZ New Zealand Limited, independent registered valuers, at depreciated replacement cost as at 31 December 2005. This is deemed to be cost. Additions since 31 December 2005 are recorded at cost less accumulated depreciation and any accumulated impairment in value.

Additions

The cost of an item of property, plant, and equipment is recognised as an asset if, and only if, it is probable that future economic benefits or service potential associated with the item will flow to CPIT and Group and the cost of the item can be measured reliably.

Work in progress is recognised at cost less impairment and is not depreciated.

In most instances, an item of property, plant, and equipment is initially recognised at its cost. Where an asset is acquired at no cost, or for a nominal cost, it is recognised at fair value as at the date of acquisition.

In most instances, an item of property, plant, and equipment is initially recognised at its cost. Where an asset is acquired at no cost, or for a nominal cost, it is recognised at fair value as at the date of acquisition.

Disposals

Gains and losses on disposals are determined by comparing the disposal proceeds with the carrying amount of the asset. Gains and losses on disposals are reported net in the surplus or deficit. When revalued assets are sold, the amounts included in property revaluation reserves in respect of those assets are transferred to general funds.

7 Depreciation

Depreciation of the Parent is calculated on the following basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:

  • Buildings – 1.1% - 3.3% straight line
  • Electronic Equipment – 10% - 33.3% straight line
  • Motor Vehicles – 20% straight line
  • Plant – 5% - 20% straight line
  • Furniture – 10% straight line
  • Library Books – 10% straight line
  • Capitalised Finance Lease Assets – 33% straight line

Artworks Collection and land is not depreciated.


For the Group, depreciation is calculated on the following basis over the estimated useful life of the asset as follows:

  • Buildings – 1.1% - 4.8% straight line
  • Electronic Equipment – 10% - 33.3% straight line
  • Motor Vehicles – 20% straight line
  • Plant – 5% - 21.6% straight line
  • Furniture – 10% straight line
  • Library Books – 10% straight line
  • Capitalised Finance Lease Assets – 33% straight line

Art collection and land is not depreciated.

8 Impairment

Assets that have a finite useful life are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount may not be recoverable. An impairment loss is recognised for the amount by which the asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount. The recoverable amount is the higher of an asset’s fair value less costs to sell and value in use.

Value in use is depreciated replacement cost for an asset where the future economic benefits or service potential of the asset are not primarily dependent on the asset's ability to generate net cash inflows and where the entity would, if deprived of the asset, replace its remaining future economic benefits or service potential.

The value in use for cash-generating assets is the present value of expected future cash flows.

If an asset’s carrying amount exceeds its recoverable amount the asset is impaired and the carrying amount is written down to the recoverable amount. For revalued assets the impairment loss is recognised against the revaluation reserve for that class of asset. Where that results in a debit balance in the revaluation reserve, the balance is recognised in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance.

For assets not carried at a revalued amount, the total impairment loss is recognised in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance.

The reversal of an impairment loss on a revalued asset is credited to the revaluation reserve. However, to the extent that an impairment loss for that class of asset was previously recognised in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance, a reversal of the impairment loss is also recognised in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance.

For assets not carried at a revalued amount the reversal of an impairment loss is recognised in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance.

9 Revaluations

Following initial recognition at cost, land and buildings are carried at a revalued amount which is the fair value at the date of the revaluation less any subsequent accumulated depreciation on buildings and accumulated impairment losses.

Fair value of land and non-specialised buildings is determined by reference to market-based evidence, which is the amount for which the assets could be exchanged between a knowledgeable willing buyer and a knowledgeable willing seller in an arm’s length transaction as at the valuation date. Where buildings have been designed specifically for educational purposes they are valued at depreciated replacement cost (DRC) which is considered to reflect fair value for such assets. In determining DRC, the following assumptions have been applied. Replacement cost rates are derived from construction contracts of like assets, reference to publications, and New Zealand Property Institute cost information. Straight line depreciation has been applied to all DRC valued assets to establish the DRC value. Economic lives have been defined and used to determine the DRC.

Any net revaluation surplus is credited to the asset revaluation reserve included in the equity section of the Statement of Financial Position unless it reverses a net revaluation decrease of the same asset previously recognised in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance.

Any net revaluation decrease is recognised in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance unless it directly offsets a previous net revaluation increase in the same asset revaluation reserve.

Any accumulated depreciation as at revaluation date is eliminated against the gross carrying amount of the asset and the net amount is restated to the revalued amount of the asset.

Upon disposal, any revaluation reserve relating to the particular asset being sold is transferred to retained earnings.

Independent valuations are performed with sufficient regularity to ensure that the carrying amount does not differ materially from the asset's fair value at the Balance Sheet date.

An item of property, plant and equipment is de-recognised upon disposal or when no future economic benefits are expected to arise from the continued use of the asset. Any gain or loss arising on derecognition of the asset (calculated as the difference between the net disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the item) is included in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance in the year the item is de-recognised.

10 Capital Work in Progress

Capital work in progress is calculated on the basis of expenditure incurred and certified gross progress claim certificates up to balance date. Work in progress is not depreciated. The total cost of a project is transferred to the relevant asset class on its completion and then depreciated.

11 Investment Property

An investment property is initially measured at its cost including transaction cost.

Where an investment property is acquired at no cost or nominal cost, its cost is deemed to be its fair value as at the date of acquisition.

Subsequent to initial recognition investment properties are stated at fair value as at each balance sheet date.

Gains or losses arising from changes in the fair values of investment properties are recognised in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance in the year in which they arise.

Investment properties are de-recognised when they have either been disposed of or when the investment property is permanently withdrawn from use and no future benefit is expected from its disposal.

Any gains or losses on de-recognition of an investment property are recognised in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance in the year of de-recognition.

Investment property land held under the Ōtautahi Education Development Trust was revalued as at 31 December 2013 in accordance with NZIAS-40.

The valuation was completed by independent valuer Mark Dunbar BCom (VPM), ANZIV, SPINZ, AREINZ of Telfer Young.

12 Intangible Assets

Computer Software

Computer software is capitalised at its cost as at the date of acquisition and amortised over its useful life on a straight line basis, currently 10% - 33.3%.

The amortisation period for each class of intangible asset having a finite life is reviewed at each financial year end. If the expected useful life or expected pattern of consumption is different from the previous assessment, changes are made accordingly. The carrying value of each class of intangible asset is reviewed for indicators of impairment annually. Intangible assets are tested for impairment where an indicator of impairment exists.

Gains and losses arising from de-recognition of an intangible asset are measured as the difference between the net disposal proceeds and the carrying amount of the asset and are recognised in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance when the asset is de-recognised.

Research and Course Development Costs

Research and course development costs are recognised as an expense in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance in the year in which they are incurred.

13 Inventories

Inventories are valued at the lower of cost and net realisable value. The cost of inventory is based on a first-in, first-out basis and includes expenditure incurred in acquiring the inventories and in bringing them to their existing location and condition. Net realisable value is the estimated selling price in the ordinary course of activities less the estimated costs necessary to make the sale.

14 GST and Other Taxes

GST

Revenues, expenses and assets are recognised net of the amount of GST except:

  • where the GST incurred on a purchase of goods and services is not recoverable from the taxation authority, in which case the GST is recognised as part of the cost of acquisition of the asset or as part of the expense item as applicable; and
  • receivables and trade payables are stated with the amount of GST included.

The net amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority is included as part of receivables and payables in the Statement of Financial Position.

The GST component of cash flows arising from investing and financing activities, which is recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority are classified as operating cash flows.

Commitments and contingencies are disclosed net of the amount of GST recoverable from, or payable to, the taxation authority.

Taxation

Tertiary institutes are exempt from the payment of income tax. Accordingly, no charge for income tax has been provided.

15 Financial Instruments

CPIT is party to financial instruments as part of its normal operations. These financial instruments include bank accounts, investments, debtors, creditors and loans.

Revenues and expenses in relation to all financial instruments are recognised in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance. All financial instruments are recognised in the Statement of Financial Position. Except for loans which are shown at cost and those items covered by a separate accounting policy, all financial instruments are shown at their estimated fair value.

Available for Sale

Available for sale financial assets are non-derivative financial assets that are designated as available for sale or are not classified in any other categories of financial assets. Available for sale financial assets are recognised initially at cost and any directly attributable transaction costs, being the fair value of the consideration given.

After initial recognition, investments which are classified as available-for-sale are measured at fair value or at cost in cases where the fair value cannot be reliably measured. Gains or losses on available-for-sale investments are recognised as a separate component of equity until the investment is sold, collected or otherwise disposed of, or until the investment is determined to be impaired, at which time the cumulative gain or loss previously reported in equity is included in the Statement of Financial Performance.

Financial assets in this category include shares.

Loans and Receivables

Loans and receivables (including cash and cash equivalents, and debtors and other receivables) are non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments that are not quoted in an active market. They are included in current assets, except for maturities greater than 12 months after the balance date, which are included in non-current assets. Related party receivables that are repayable on demand are classified as a non-current asset because repayment of the receivable is not expected within 12 months of

After initial recognition, loans and receivables are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method less any provision for impairment. Gains and losses when the asset is impaired or de-recognised are recognised in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance.

Non-derivative financial assets with fixed or determinable payments and fixed maturity are classified as held-to-maturity when the Group has the positive intention and ability to hold to maturity.

Investments intended to be held for an undefined period are not included in this classification.

Investments that are intended to be held-to-maturity or those classified as loans and receivables, are subsequently measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method.

Amortised cost is calculated by taking into account any discount or premium on acquisition, over the period to maturity.

For investments carried at amortised cost, gains and losses are recognised in income when the investments are de-recognised or impaired, as well as through the amortisation process.

For investments where there is no quoted market price, fair value is determined by reference to the current market value of another instrument which is substantially the same or is calculated based on the expected cash flows of the underlying net asset base of the investment. Where the fair value cannot be reliably determined the investments are measured at cost.

Financial Assets at Fair Value through Surplus or Deficit

Financial assets at fair value through surplus or deficit in the Statement of Financial Performance include financial assets held for trading. A financial asset is classified in this category if acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the short-term or is part of a portfolio that are managed together and for which there is evidence of short-term profit-taking. Derivatives are also categorised as held for trading unless they are designated into hedge accounting relationship for which hedge accounting is applied.

Financial assets acquired principally for the purpose of selling in the short-term or part of a portfolio classified as held for trading are classified as a current asset. The current/non-current classification of derivatives is explained in the derivatives accounting policy above.

16 Cash Flows, Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash and cash equivalents in the Statement of Financial Position comprise cash at bank and in hand and short-term deposits with an original maturity of three months or less. For the purposes of the Cash Flow Statement, cash and cash equivalents consist of cash and cash equivalents as defined above, net of outstanding bank overdrafts.

Operating Activities: Transactions and other movements that are not investing or financing activities.

Investing Activities: Activities relating to acquisition, holding and disposal of fixed assets and of investments, not falling within the definition of cash.

Financing Activities: Activities that change the equity and debt capital structure of CPIT.

17 Student Fees and Other Receivables

Student fees and other receivables are classified as loans and receivables and carried at amortised cost less any provision for impairment.

An estimate for doubtful debts is made when collection of the full amount is no longer probable, defined as being when the debt is placed into external debt collection procedures. Bad debts are written off when it is impractical or uneconomic to pursue the debts further.

18 Trade Payables

Trade payables are recognised and carried at amortised cost.

19 Loans and Borrowings

All loans and borrowings are initially recognised at cost, being the fair value of the consideration received net of transaction costs associated with the borrowing.

After initial recognition, interest-bearing loans and borrowings are measured at amortised cost using the effective interest method. Amortised cost is calculated by taking into account any transaction costs, and any discount or premium on settlement.

Suspensory loans are funds provided which do not have to be repaid if certain obligations are met. Where such obligations are likely to be met the funds are recognised immediately as an equity injection in the Statement of Movements in Equity.

Gains and losses are recognised in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance when the liabilities are de-recognised as well as through the amortisation process.

20 Borrowing Cost

CPIT and the Group have elected to defer the adoption of the revised NZ IAS 23 Borrowing Costs (Revised 2007) in accordance with the transitional provisions of NZ IAS 23 that are applicable to public benefit entities.

Consequently, all borrowing costs are recognised as an expense in the period in which they are incurred

21 Provisions

Provisions are recognised when the Group has a present obligation (legal or constructive) as a result of a past event, it is probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation and a reliable estimate can be made of the amount of the obligation.

If the effect of the time value of money is material, provisions are determined by discounting the expected future cash flows at a pre-tax rate that reflects current market assessments of the time value of money and, where appropriate, the risks specific to the liability.

Provisions are reviewed at each balance date and adjusted to reflect the current best estimate. Where it is no longer probable that an outflow of resources embodying economic benefits will be required to settle the obligation, the provision shall be reversed.

Where discounting is used, the increase in the provision due to the passage of time is recognised as a finance cost.

22 Leases

Finance leases, which transfer to the Group substantially all the risks and benefits incidental to ownership of the leased item, are capitalised at the inception of the lease at the fair value of the leased property or, if lower, at the present value of the minimum lease payments.

Lease payments are apportioned between the finance charges and reduction of the lease liability so as to achieve a constant rate of interest on the remaining balance of the liability. Finance charges are included in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance as finance costs.

Capitalised leased assets are depreciated over the shorter of the estimated useful life of the asset and the lease term.

Leases where the lessor retains substantially all the risks and benefits of ownership of the asset are classified as operating leases. Initial direct costs incurred in negotiating an operating lease are added to the carrying amount of the leased asset and recognised over the lease term on the same basis as the lease expense.

Operating lease payments are recognised as an expense in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance on a straight line basis over the lease term.

23 Employee Entitlements

Provision is made in respect of CPIT’s liability for annual leave, sick leave, long service leave and retirement gratuities.

Annual leave has been calculated on an actual entitlement basis for current rates of pay.

Sick leave has been calculated based on the expected utilisation of unused entitlement.

Long service leave and retirement gratuities are calculated based on the present value of estimated future cash flows determined on an actuarial basis. The discount rate is the market yield on relevant New Zealand Government Stock at the Balance Sheet date.

Obligations for contributions to defined contribution pension plans are recognised as an expense in the surplus or deficit of the Statement of Financial Performance as incurred.

24 Allocation of Overheads

Overheads have been allocated to output faculties utilising an activities based costing model.

The cost drivers are:

  • Full time equivalent staff (FTES)
  • Equivalent full time students (EFTS)
  • General expenditure grant (GEG) budgets
  • Number of computers
  • Number of programmes

25 Comparatives

When presentation or classification of items in the financial statements is amended or accounting policies are changed voluntarily, comparative figures are restated to ensure consistency with the current period unless it is impractical to do so.

26 Budget Figures

The budget figures are those approved by the Council at the beginning of the financial year. They have been prepared in accordance with generally accepted accounting practice and are consistent with the accounting policies adopted by the Council for the preparation of the financial statements.

27 Foreign Currency Translation

Both the functional and presentation currency of CPIT and its New Zealand subsidiaries is New Zealand dollars ($).

Non-monetary items that are measured in terms of historical cost in a foreign currency are translated using the exchange rate as at the date of the initial transaction.

Non-monetary items measured at fair value in a foreign currency are translated using the exchange rates at the date when the fair value was determined.

28 Non-Current Assets Held for Sale

Non-current assets are separately classified where their carrying amount will be recovered through a sale transaction rather than continuing use; that is, where such assets are available for immediate sale and where sale is highly probable. These assets are recorded at the lower of their carrying amount and fair value less costs to sell.

29 Standards and Interpretations in Issue Not Yet Effective

Standards, amendments and interpretations issued but not yet effective that have not been early adopted, and which are relevant to CPIT include:

  • NZ IFRS 9 Financial Instruments will eventually replace NZ IAS 39 Financial Instruments – Recognition and Measurement.
  • NZ IAS 39 is being replaced through the following three main phases:
    • Phase 1 Classification and Measurement,
    • Phase 2 Impairment Methodology, and
    • Phase 3 Hedge Accounting.

Phase 1 on classification and measurement of financial assets has been completed and has been published in the new financial instrument standard NZ IFRS 9. NZ IFRS 9 uses a single approach to determine whether a financial asset is measured at amortised cost or fair value, replacing many different rules in NZ IAS 39. The approach in NZ IFRS 9 is based on how an entity manages its financial assets (its business model) and the contractual cash flow characteristics of the financial assets. The financial liability requirements are the same as those of NZ IAS 39, except for when an entity elects to designate a financial liability at fair value through surplus or deficit. The new standard is required to be adopted for the year ended 30 June 2016. However, as a new Accounting Standards Framework will apply before this date, there is no certainty when an equivalent standard to NZ IFRS 9 will be applied by public benefit entities. CPIT has not yet assessed the impact of the new standard and expects it will not be adopted early.

The Minister of Commerce has approved a new Accounting Standards Framework (incorporating a Tier Strategy) developed by the External Reporting Board (XRB). Under this Accounting Standards Framework, CPIT is classified as a Tier 1 reporting entity and it will be required to apply full public sector Public Benefit Entity Accounting Standards (PAS). These standards are being developed by the XRB and are mainly based on current International Public Sector Accounting Standards. The effective date for the new standards for public sector entities is expected to be for reporting periods beginning on or after 1 July 2014. This means CPIT expects to transition to the new standards in preparing its 31 December 2015 financial statements. As the PAS are still under development, CPIT is unable to assess the implications of the new Accounting Standards Framework at this time.

Due to the change in the Accounting Standards Framework for public benefit entities, it is expected that all new NZ IFRS and amendments to existing NZ IFRS will not be applicable to public benefit entities. Therefore, the XRB has effectively frozen the financial reporting requirements for public benefit entities up until the new Accounting Standards Framework is effective. Accordingly, no disclosure has been made about new or amended NZ IFRS that exclude public benefit entities from their scope.

30 Critical Accounting Estimates and Assumptions

In preparing these financial statements CPIT has made estimates and assumptions concerning the future. These estimates and assumptions may differ from the subsequent actual results. Estimates and assumptions are continually evaluated and are based on historical experience and other factors, including expectations or future events that are believed to be reasonable under the circumstances.

The estimates and assumptions that have a significant risk of causing a material adjustment to the carrying amounts of assets and liabilities within the next financial year are:

Insurance Recoveries

Management have exercised judgement when determining whether insurance payments and recoveries from CPIT’s insurers are probable, virtually certain and are measurable and therefore should be recognised as revenue in the current year.

Earthquake Related Asset Repairs and Impairment

Management have exercised judgement when determining whether earthquake related expenditure to assets is repairs and maintenance, and should be expensed in the current year or capital expenditure. Please refer to Note 21 in the accounts for further explanation.

Management have also exercised judgement in determining the amount of impairment to its assets as a result of the Canterbury earthquakes. Judgements were formed using the advice of professional advisors.

Land and Building Revaluation

Note 7 provides information about the estimates and assumptions exercised in the measurement of revalued land and buildings.

Long Service Leave and Retiring Gratuities

Note 11 provides information about the estimates and assumptions exercised in the measurement of long service leave and retiring gratuities.

Crown Owned Land and Buildings

Property in the legal name of the Crown that is occupied by CPIT and Group is recognised as an asset in the Statement of Financial Position. CPIT and Group consider it has assumed all the normal risks and rewards of ownership of this property despite legal ownership not being transferred and accordingly it would be misleading to exclude these assets from the financial statements.

Statement of Financial Performance  

Statement of Financial Performance  

for the Year Ended 31 December 2014

Parent

Group

Notes

Actual
2014

$000

Budget
2014
$000

Actual
2013
$000

Actual
2014
$000

Actual
2013
$000

Revenue

Government Grants

1

57,169

57,115

56,963

57,169

56,963

Student Tuition Fees

31,742

31,727

30,130

31,742

30,130

Other Income

1,19

7,109

7,218

7,363

7,243

7,418

Finance Income

1

2,613

2,375

1,971

2,912

2,375

Gain on Property Investment Revaluations

115

159

Total Revenue

98,633

98,435

96,427

99,181

97,045

Operating Expenses

Employee Benefit Expenses

1

59,115

59,226

55,500

59,115

55,515

Depreciation Expense

7

6,591

6,321

6,595

6,876

6,887

Amortisation Expense

8

319

295

276

319

276

Finance Costs

1

-

9

Other Expenses

1, 19

26,650

28,024

25,073

25,901

24,289


Total Operating Expenses before Earthquakes

92,675

93,866

87,444

92,211

86,976

Effect of Canterbury Earthquakes:

Proceeds from Insurance

19, 21

6,725

30,000

6,773

6,725

6,773

Earthquake Related Expenses

21

6,966

6,194

6,453

6,966

6,481

Net Earthquake Surplus/(Deficit)

(241)

23,806

320

(241)

292

Net Surplus

5,717

28,375

9,303

6,729

10,361

Statement of Comprehensive Income  

Statement of Comprehensive Income  

for the Year Ended 31 December 2014

Parent

Group



Notes

Actual

2014

$000

Budget

2014

$000

Actual

2013

$000

Actual

2014

$000

Actual

2013

$000

Net Surplus

5,717

28,375

9,303

6,729

10,361

Other Comprehensive Income

Gains/(Losses) on Property Revaluations

7

(6,775)

-

(4,438)

90

Impairment of Buildings

7, 21

-

(3,623)

-

(3,623)

Total Other Comprehensive Income

(6,775)

-

(3,623)

(4,438)

(3,533)

Total Comprehensive Income

(1,058)

28,375

5,680

2,291

6,828

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements

Statement of Financial Position  

Statement of Financial Position  

as at 31 December 2014

Parent

Group

Notes

Actual

2014

$000

Budget

2014

$000

Actual

2013

$000

Actual

2014

$000

Actual

2013

$000

ASSETS

Current Assets

Cash and Cash Equivalents

2,5

7,007

1,799

6,543

7,263

7,461

Trade and Other Receivables

3

6,553

1,803

8,272

6,562

8,273

Inventories

4

999

1,069

902

999

902

Prepayments

805

272

398

805

398

Other Financial Assets

5

42,504

44,000

47,900

43,855

49,183

Total Current Assets

57,868

48,943

64,015

59,484

66,217

Non–Current Assets

Land and Buildings

7,19

164,441

206,354

156,685

180,372

169,031

Plant and Equipment

7

11,903

11,586

11,586

11,968

11,655

Other Financial Assets

5

5

55

55

2,760

2,607

Investment Properties

6

2,600

2,485

Intangible Assets

8

1,576

1,875

1,793

1,576

1,793

Total Non–Current Assets

177,925

219,870

170,119

199,276

187,571








TOTAL ASSETS

235,793

268,813

234,134

258,760

253,788

LIABILITIES

Current Liabilities

Trade and Other Payables

9

8,558

6,920

6,324

8,625

6,421

Finance Leases

10

572

514

542

572

542

Employee Benefit Liabilities

11

3,730

4,768

3,312

3,730

3,312

Revenue Received in Advance

12

6,499

4,715

6,653

6,499

6,653

Total Current Liabilities

19,359

16,917

16,831

19,426

16,928

Non–Current Liabilities

Finance Leases

10

531

387

452

531

452

Employee Benefit Liabilities

11

829

719

719

829

719

Total Non–Current Liabilities

1,360

1,106

1,171

1,360

1,171








TOTAL LIABILITIES

20,719

18,023

18,002

20,786

18,099








NET ASSETS

215,074

250,790

216,132

237,974

235,689

EQUITY

Retained Earnings

143,096

168,279

137,401

155,238

148,621

Asset Revaluation Reserve

71,343

81,898

78,118

82,101

86,455

Restricted Reserves

635

613

613

635

613

TOTAL EQUITY

215,074

250,790

216,132

237,974

235,689

The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements

Statement of Cash Flows  

Statement of Cash Flows  

for the Year Ended 31 December 2014

Parent

Group

Notes

Actual

2014

$000

Budget

2014

$000

Actual

2013

$000

Actual

2014

$000

Actual

2013

$000

Cash Flows from Operating Activities

Receipts of Government Grants

57,270

57,115

54,447

57,270

54,447

Receipts of Student Tuition Fees

32,296

31,235

31,108

32,296

31,108

Receipts of Other Income

7,950

6,595

7,455

8,076

7,528

Interest Received

2,646

2,375

1,994

2,825

2,212

Payments to Employees

(58,587)

(58,990)

(55,903)

(58,587)

(55,918)

Payments to Suppliers

(27,027)

(27,531)

(25,214)

(26,313)

(24,569)

Receipts of Earthquake Proceeds

7,332

-

1,063

7,322

1,063

Payments of Earthquake Expenses

(6,966)

-

(6,453)

(6,966)

(6,453)

Interest Paid

-

(9)

Net Cash Flows from Operating Activities

2

14,904

10,799

8,497

15,923

9,409

Cash Flows from Investing Activities

Proceeds from Sale of Property, Plant and Equipment

36

623

21

36

21

Proceeds from Sale and Maturity of Investments

19

135,000

7,000

115,499

135,000

116,730

Proceeds from Insurance Settlement

30,000

Purchase of Intangible Assets

(102)

(230)

(133)

(102)

(133)

Purchase of Property, Plant and Equipment

19

(19,162)

(57,295)

(5,880)

(20,691)

(6,401)

Purchase of Investments

19

(129,604)

(125,099)

(129,756)

(126,430)

Net Cash Flows from Investing Activities

(13,832)

(19,902)

(15,592)

(15,513)

(16,213)

Cash Flows from Financing Activities

Proceeds from Loans and Borrowings

50

50

Capital Injection from Crown

-

9,450

9,450

-

9,450

Repayment of Loans and Borrowings

-

(350)

Repayment of Finance Lease Liabilities

(658)

(645)

(760)

(658)

(760)

Net Cash Flows from Financing Activities

(608)

8,805

8,690

(608)

8,340







Net (Decrease)/Increase in Cash and Cash Equivalents

464

(298)

1,595

(199)

1,536







Cash and Cash Equivalents at the Beginning of the Year

6,543

2,097

4,948

7,461

5,925







Cash and Cash Equivalents at the End of the Year

2

7,007

1,799

6,543

7,263

7,461







The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements

Statement of Changes in Equity  

Statement of Changes in Equity  

for the Year Ended 31 December 2014

Parent

Group

Notes

Actual

2014

$000

Budget

2014

$000

Actual

2013

$000

Actual

2014

$000

Actual

2013

$000

Balance at 1 January

216,132

212,965

201,002

235,689

219,411

Capital Injection from Crown

-

9,450

9,450

-

9,450

Total Comprehensive Income

(1,058)

28,375

5,680

2,291

6,828

Revaluation Readjustment

-

-

-

(6)

-

Balance at 31 December

215,074

250,790

216,132

237,974

235,689

By Class

Retained Earnings

Balance at 1 January

137,401

130,454

119,104

148,621

129,266

Capital Injection from Crown

-

9,450

9,450

-

9,450

Net Surplus/(Deficit) for the Year

5,717

28,375

9,303

6,729

10,361

Appropriation of Net Surplus to Restricted Reserves

(22)

-

(456)

(22)

(456)

Revaluation Readjustment

-

-

-

(90)

-

Balance at 31 December

143,096

168,279

137,401

155,238

148,621







Restricted Reserves

Balance at 1 January

613

613

157

613

157

Appropriation of Net Surplus

26

8

26

8

Application of Trusts and Bequests

(4)

(2)

(4)

(2)

Donation from N M McIlroy Trust

-

450

-

450

Balance at 31 December

635

613

613

635

613







Restricted reserves consist of scholarships, bequests and trust funds held by the Institute on behalf of others.







Asset Revaluation Reserve

Balance at 1 January

78,118

81,898

81,741

86,455

89,988

Fair Value Revaluation of Land and Buildings

(6,775)

(4,438)

90

Impairment of Buildings

7, 21

-

(3,623)

-

(3,623)

Revaluation Readjustment

-

84

Balance at 31 December

71,343

81,898

78,118

82,101

86,455







The asset revaluation reserve is used to record increments and decrements in the fair value of land and buildings to the extent that they offset one another.







Asset Revaluation Reserve is comprised of:

Land

31,315

16,640

16,640

38,163

21,258

Buildings

40,028

65,258

61,478

43,938

65,197

71,343

81,898

78,118

82,101

86,455







The accompanying notes form part of these financial statements

Statement of Cost of Services  

Statement of Cost of Services  

for the Year Ended 31 December 2014

Parent

2014

$000

Parent

2013

$000

Attributed to Departments:

Business

7,085

6,356

Computing

5,725

6,030

Creative Industries

12,033

12,022

Engineering & Architectural Studies

8,283

7,920

Food & Hospitality

9,241

7,831

Humanities

10,810

11,159

Nursing

14,016

12,661

Applied Science & Allied Health

7,913

7,501

Trades

17,569

15,964

92,675

87,444

Represented by:

Personnel

59,115

55,500

Consumables/Departments costs

6,408

7,238

Administration

12,499

9,766

Occupancy/Property costs

7,743

8,069

Depreciation and Amortisation

6,910

6,871

92,675

87,444

Earthquake related expenditure has not been included in the cost of service calculation, as the costs cannot be directly attributable to individual departments.

Childcare Operating Incomes and Expenditure  

Childcare Operating Incomes and Expenditure  

for the Year Ended 31 December 2014 (Parent and Group)

Actual 2014
$

Budget 2014
$

Actual 2013
$

Income

Operating Grants

519,528

451,121

528,702

Fees

255,559

374,588

245,520

Total

775,087

825,709

774,222

Expenditure

Salaries and Related Costs

698,265

723,715

678,830

Consumables

2,694

2,000

13,379

Administration

31,164

35,250

22,752

Occupancy Costs

59,194

58,000

48,863

Depreciation

1,203

1,200

1,204

Total

792,520

820,165

765,028


Net Surplus/(Deficit)

(17,433)

5,544

9,194


Capital Expenditure


Total Child Funded Hours

2014

2013

Children Aged Under Two

12,905

13,565

Children Aged Two and Over

17,400

13,361

20 Hours ECE

25,921

28,019

Plus 10 Subsidy

4,335

5,662

60,561

60,607

Statement of Special Supplementary Grants  

Statement of Special Supplementary Grants  

The Institute received certain funding as Special Supplementary Grants during 2014. These items are subject to Section 199(1)(b) of the Education Act 1989. There is a requirement in Section 199(5) to apply such grants only for the purposes specified. The following statement reports on this obligation and discloses the actual cost to CPIT which resulted from the activities funded in this manner.

Grant Title

Amount

$

Applied to

Salaries &

Related Costs

$

Materials &

Services

$

Cost

$

Cost to

CPIT

$

Students with Severe Disabilities

43,078

Students with Severe Disabilities

}

305,098

7,637

312,735

163,843 *

Tertiary Students with Disabilities

105,814

Tertiary Students with Disabilities

Support for Māori and Pacific People

83,127

Support for Māori and Pacific People

7,549

83,855

91,404

8,277

Total

232,019

312,647

91,492

404,139

172,120

* Disabilities grants are spent in common.

Compulsory Student Services Fees  

Compulsory Student Services Fees  

Pursuant to sections 227A(1) and 235D(1) of the Education Act 1989, CPIT is required to show how the use of the compulsory fees for student services is attributed.

Accounting for the use of compulsory student services fees are separately accounted for in CPIT's accounting system.

Students are charged $170 plus GST for a full time equivalent fee per annum.

If the student is enrolled less than a full time equivalent the fee is prorated.

Actual 2014
$

Actual 2013
$

Compulsory Student Services Fees Collected

788,273

782,801


Applied to:

$

$

Advocacy and Legal Advice

491,754

415,393

Careers Information, Advice and Guidance

21,057

123,435

Counselling Services and Pastoral Care

32,403

54,412

Employment Information

160,325

181,790

Financial Support and Advice

874,828

703,559

Health Services (nett of any service charge)

226,797

194,396

Media Services

7,009

650

Childcare Services (nett of any service charge)

17,434

(9,194)

Sports, Recreation and Cultural Activities

367,165

253,087

Total

2,198,772

1,917,528



Net Surplus/(Deficit)

(1,410,499)

(1,134,727)

Advocacy and Legal Advice

Advocacy support is provided to students needing help to resolve problems. Advocacy is undertaken by an impartial person on behalf of students, and they also provide legal advice as necessary. All issues are resolved or escalated to a higher level to be heard and resolved.

Careers information, advice and guidance

Support is provided to students to assist their transition into employment. Support includes CV workshops, interview practice, job search, industry research, preparation for internships, one-on-one advice and liaison with Career Guides.

Counselling services and pastoral care

An independent company is contracted to provide Counselling services to students as required. Internal pastoral care across CPIT is provided to students.

Employment information

This service is undertaken by Careers Guidance, and is developing within the Polytechnic. Links to industry and the workplace are being established, industry representatives will be brought onto the campuses to provide a workplace perspective as part of an interview panel for practise interviews and providing industry focus through information evenings and fairs.

Financial support and advice

Budgeting advice is freely available for students. Hardship situations are assessed and help may be provided with financial assistance.

Health Services

CPIT has a Student Health Centre, with doctors and nurses available for students to access as needed. They provide a variety of services to support students to stay well, receive timely advice and gain medical assistance.

Media Services

CPIT supports online communities and maintains a website for current students called 'Campus Life'. This provides students with information about all services and includes a student blog, student chat, an opinion poll and up to date events at CPIT and in Christchurch such as Radar-the online video newsletter.

Childcare Services

At the Madras Street Campus there are two early learning centres (one bilingual and operated by a Trust) caring for children up to the age of five years old. Both centres are open to students, staff and members of the community offering quality care and education.

Sports, recreation and cultural activities

Students can access the sports court and equipment at no charge during weekdays. CPIT offers a range of classes (some free) in boxing, weights, exercise machines, circuit classes, yoga, badminton and social sports competitions held throughout the year. Students can join the gym for a very low annual fee and have access six days a week. Throughout the academic year, CPIT also provides weekly free events and activities for students including sports, and cultural activities. These include bar-b-ques, music, Polyculture, 'have a go', themed events, dress-up and social competitions.
Cultural events consist of Language weeks (Maori, Pasifika), Matariki, Hangi, Umu, community events, kaumātua cuisine, study/well being workshops, professional network workshops, Rakatahi awards, celebrating Māori and Pasifika achievement events i.e. He Toki, Pasifika Trades and Eke Panuku, merchandise, and other incentives.

Notes to Financial Statements  

Notes to Financial Statements  

Note 1
Revenue and Expenses

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Government Grants

Normal Operational Grants

56,937

54,313

56,937

54,313

2012 Funding Retention*

2,431

-

2,431

Special Supplementary Grants

232

219

232

219

57,169

56,963

57,169

56,963

Other Income

Gains/(Losses) on Disposal of Property, Plant and Equipment

36

-

36

-

Revenue from Other Operating Activities

7,073

7,363

7,207

7,418

7,109

7,363

7,243

7,418

Finance Income/Costs

Interest Earned on Investments (including Bank Deposits)

2,613

1,971

2,793

2,189

Gains on Changes in Investments classified as Fair Value through Profit and Loss

119

186

Total Finance Income

2,613

1,971

2,912

2,375






Interest on Bank Loans

-

9

Total Finance Costs

-

9

Employee Benefit Expenses

Wages and Salaries

57,137

54,516

57,137

54,531

Post Employment Benefits

1,450

1,387

1,450

1,387

Increase/(Decrease) in Employee Benefit Liabilities

528

(403)

528

(403)

59,115

55,500

59,115

55,515

Other Expenses

Audit New Zealand Fees for Financial Statement Audits

121

118

121

118

Audit New Zealand Fees for Audit of CPIT Foundation Financial Statements

9

10

Other Auditor Fees for Audit of OEDT Financial Statements

5

4

Audit New Zealand Fees for Audit of CPIT Holdings Ltd Financial Statements

3

2

3

2

Donations Made

7

2

7

2

Impairment of Receivables (Note 3)

(33)

184

(33)

184

Research and Development Expenditure

164

264

164

264

Minimum Lease Payments under Operating Leases

1,275

1,338

317

354

Losses on Disposal of Property, Plant and Equipment

-

414

-

414

Other Operating Expenses

25,113

22,751

25,308

22,937

26,650

25,073

25,901

24,289


2013 content There are no unfulfilled conditions or other contingencies attached to government grants recognised.

*During 2013 CPIT clarified with the TEC the level of funding retention associated with the post-earthquake funding guarantee. This guarantee came into effect from 2012, however due to confirmation being received in 2013, full recognition did not take place until this financial year.

Note 2
Cash and Cash Equivalents

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Cash at Bank and in Hand

6,909

6,447

7,165

7,365

Short-Term Deposits

98

96

98

96

7,007

6,543

7,263

7,461


Cash at Bank and in Hand represents physical cash on hand and money at bank immediately available.

Short-Term Deposits represent term deposits with a maturity of three months or less.

The carrying value of short-term deposits with maturity dates of three months or less approximates their fair value.

Apart from the restricted reserves there is no cash and cash equivalents that can only be used for a specified purpose.

Reconciliation of net surplus/(deficit) to net cash flows from operating activities

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Net Surplus

5,717

9,303

6,729

10,361

Add/(Less) Non–Cash Items:

Depreciation and Amortisation

6,910

6,871

7,195

7,163

Gains on the Revaluation of Investments

(119)

(186)

Recognition of Movement in Term Employee Benefits in Employee Benefit Expenses

110

-

110

-

Add/(Less) Items Classified as Investing or Financing Activities:

(Gains)/Losses on Disposal of Property, Plant and Equipment

(36)

414

(36)

414

Revaluation of Investment Properties

(115)

(159)

Donated Assets

-

(170)

-

(170)

Add/(Less) Movements in Working Capital Items:

Accounts Receivable

1,719

(6,469)

1,711

(6,451)

Inventories

(97)

167

(97)

167

Prepayments

(407)

(126)

(407)

(126)

Accounts Payable

724

(597)

688

(708)

Income in Advance

(154)

(493)

(154)

(493)

Employee Benefits

418

(403)

418

(403)

Net Cash Inflow from Operating Activities

14,904

8,497

15,923

9,409

Note 3
Trade and Other Receivables

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Current

Trade Receivables

6,338

8,053

6,338

8,054

Bank Interest Receivable

380

413

389

413

Related Party Receivables

43

47

43

47

Less Provision for Impairment of Receivables

(208)

(241)

(208)

(241)

6,553

8,272

6,562

8,273




The carrying value of trade and other receivables approximates their fair value.

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Maturity Analysis

Current Debt

6,122

7,322

6,131

7,323

Overdue but not Impaired 61 to 90 days

46

100

46

100

Overdue but not Impaired >90 days

385

850

385

850

6,553

8,272

6,562

8,273


As of 31 December 2014 and 2013, all overdue receivables have been assessed for impairment and appropriate provisions applied. CPIT holds no collateral as security or other credit enhancements over receivables that are either past due or impaired.

The impairment provision has been calculated based on expected losses for CPIT's pool of debtors.

Expected losses have been determined based on the age of debtors and review of specific debtors.

Movement in the provision for impairment of receivables is as follows:

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Opening Balance

241

57

241

57

Receivables Written Off During Period

189

4

189

4

Additional Provisions Made During the Year

(222)

180

(222)

180

Closing Balance

208

241

208

241

Note 4
Inventories

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Held for Resale

9

7

9

7

Materials and Consumables

990

895

990

895

999

902

999

902

The write-down of inventories held for sale amounted to $nil (2013 $nil).

Note 5
Other Financial Assets

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Current Portion

Loans and Receivables

Bank Deposits Maturing Within 12 months

42,504

47,900

43,855

49,183

Total Current Portion

42,504

47,900

43,855

49,183

Non–current Portion

Available for Sale Investments

Shares in Subsidiaries

5

5

Unlisted Shares – PINZ Ltd

-

50

-

50

Fair Value through Profit and Loss

Managed Funds

2,760

2,557

Total Non–current Portion

5

55

2,760

2,607

Effective Interest Rates

Bank Deposits with Maturities of 4–12 months

4.13%

3.73%

4.13%

3.73%

There were no impairment provisions for other financial assets.

Shares in subsidiaries and unlisted entities have no quoted price in an active market.

As no fair value can be reliably measured, shares are recorded at cost. CPIT does not intend to dispose of these shares.

The Managed Funds are stated at fair value. The assets within these portfolios are actively traded and fair value is determined by direct reference to published prices in active markets.

Credit Quality of Financial Assets

The credit quality of financial assets that are neither past due nor impaired can be assessed by reference to Standard and Poor’s credit ratings (if available) or to historical information about counterparty default rates:






Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Counterparties with Credit Ratings

Cash and Cash Equivalents:

AA- Cash at Bank and in Hand

6,909

6,447

7,165

7,365

AA- Short-Term Deposits

98

96

98

96

7,007

6,543

7,263

7,461

Term deposits:

AA–

40,504

41,500

41,845

42,457

A+

2,000

6,400

2,000

6,400

BBB

10

326

Total

42,504

47,900

43,855

49,183






Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Counterparties with Credit Ratings

Other Investments:

Existing Counterparty with no Defaults in the Past

5

55

2,760

2,607

Total Other Investments

5

55

2,760

2,607

Note 6
Investment Properties

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Balance 1 January

2,485

2,326

Fair Value Gain/(Loss)

115

159

Balance 31 December

2,600

2,485

The Mobil Oil Land (situated at 193 Madras Street) is classified as Investment Property.
The Mobil Oil Land was revalued by Telfer Young on 10 February 2015 as at 31 December 2014.
The valuation was completed by independent valuer, Mark Dunbar BCom (VPM), ANZIV, SPINZ, AREINZ of Telfer Young.
Property held for investment purposes is revalued on an annual basis.

Note 7
Property, Plant and Equipment




2014 Parent



Cost/
Revaluation

1 January 2014

$000

Accumulated

Depreciation

and
Impairment

1 January 2014

$000



Carrying

Amount

1 January 2014

$000



Current
Year

Additions

$000



Current
Year

Disposals

$000


Current
Year

Impairment

Charges*

$000



Current
Year

Depreciation

$000




Revaluation

Changes

$000



Cost/
Revaluation
31 December 2014

$000

Accumulated

Depreciation

and
Impairment

31 December 2014

$000



Carrying

Amount

31 December 2014

$000

Institution Land and Buildings

81,657

(3,570)

78,087

18,278

-

(1,707)

-

74,462

Crown Land and Buildings

86,014

(7,416)

78,598

-

-

-

(2,040)

13,421

89,979

-

89,979

Computer Equipment

6,456

(3,483)

2,973

1,227

-

(933)

-

7,591

(4,324)

3,267

Computer Equipment under Finance Lease

994

-

994

767

(658)

-

1,103

-

1,103

Plant

7,653

(4,400)

3,253

574

(11)

-

(640)

-

8,025

(4,849)

3,176

Furniture

6,568

(5,506)

1,062

100

-

(174)

-

6,668

(5,680)

988

Vehicles

591

(390)

201

285

-

-

(89)

-

853

(456)

397

Library Collection

5,227

(2,937)

2,290

215

-

(350)

-

5,442

(3,287)

2,155

Art Collection

813

-

813

4

-

817

817

195,973

(27,702)

168,271

21,450

(11)

-

(6,591)

(6,775)

194,940

(18,596)

176,344




2014 Group



Cost/
Revaluation

1 January 2014

$000

Accumulated

Depreciation

and
Impairment

1 January 2014

$000



Carrying

Amount

1 January 2014

$000



Current
Year

Additions

$000



Current
Year

Disposals

$000


Current
Year

Impairment

Charges*

$000



Current
Year

Depreciation

$000




Revaluation

Changes

$000



Cost/
Revaluation
31 December 2014

$000

Accumulated

Depreciation

and
Impairment

31 December 2014

$000



Carrying

Amount

31 December 2014

$000

Group Land and Buildings

95,328

(4,895)

90,433

19,803

-

-

(1,983)

(17,859)

91,994

(1,601)

90,383

Crown Land and Buildings

86,014

(7,416)

78,598

-

-

-

(2,040)

13,421

89,979

-

89,979

Computer Equipment

10,021

(7,044)

2,977

1,227

-

(933)

-

11,156

(7,885)

3,271

Computer Equipment under Finance Lease

994

-

994

767

-

(658)

-

1,103

-

1,103

Plant

12,528

(9,211)

3,317

579

(11)

-

(649)

-

12,905

(9,669)

3,236

Furniture

6,568

(5,506)

1,062

100

-

(174)

-

6,668

(5,680)

988

Vehicles

925

(723)

202

285

-

(89)

1,165

(767)

398

Library Collection

5,227

(2,937)

2,290

215

(350)

-

5,442

(3,287)

2,155

Art Collection

813

813

4

-

-

-

817

-

817

218,418

(37,732)

180,686

22,980

(11)

-

(6,876)

(4,438)

221,229

(28,889)

192,340




2013 Parent



Cost/
Revaluation

1 January 2013

$000

Accumulated

Depreciation

and
Impairment

1 January 2013

$000



Carrying

Amount

1 January 2013

$000



Current
Year

Additions

$000



Current
Year

Disposals

$000


Current
Year

Impairment

Charges*

$000



Current
Year

Depreciation

$000




Revaluation

Changes

$000



Cost/
Revaluation
31 December 2013

$000

Accumulated

Depreciation

and
Impairment

31 December 2013

$000



Carrying

Amount

31 December 2013

$000

Institution Land and Buildings

78,348

(1,656)

76,692

3,309

-

(228)

(1,686)

-

81,657

(3,570)

78,087

Crown Land and Buildings

86,014

(1,998)

84,016

-

-

(3,395)

(2,023

-

86,014

(7,416)

78,598

Computer Equipment

5,318

(3,160)

2,158

1,578

(21)

-

(742)

-

6,456

(3,483)

2,973

Computer Equipment under Finance Lease

1,163

-

1,163

591

-

(760)

-

994

994

Plant

8,576

(4,882)

3,694

598

(410

-

(629)

-

7,653

(4,400)

3,253

Furniture

6,385

(5,331)

1,054

183

-

-

(175)

-

6,568

(5,506)

1,062

Vehicles

538

(356)

182

82

(4)

-

(59)

591

(390)

201

Library Collection

4,960

(2,416)

2,544

267

-

-

(521)

-

5,227

(2,937)

2,290

Art Collection

779

-

779

34

-

-

-

813

813

192,081

(19,799)

172,282

6,642

(435)

(3,623)

(6,595)

-

195,973

(27,702)

168,271




2013 Group



Cost/
Revaluation

1 january 2013

$000

Accumulated

Depreciation

and
Impairment

1 January 2013

$000



Carrying

Amount

1 January 2013

$000



Current
Year

Additions

$000



Current
Year

Disposals

$000


Current
Year

Impairment

Charges*

$000



Current
Year

Depreciation

$000




Revaluation

Changes

$000



Cost/
Revaluation
31 December 2013

$000

Accumulated

Depreciation

and
Impairment

31 December 2013

$000



Carrying

Amount

31 December 2013

$000

Group Land and Buildings

91,409

(2,697)

88,712

3,829

(228)

(1,970)

90

95,328

(4,895)

90,433

Crown Land and Buildings

86,014

(1,998)

84,016

-

-

(3,395)

(2,023)

-

86,014

(7,416)

78,598

Computer Equipment

8,883

(6,721)

2,162

1,578

(21)

-

(742)

-

10,021

(7,044)

2,977

Computer Equipment under Finance Lease

1,163

-

1,163

591

-

(760)

-

994

-

994

Plant

13,451

(9,685)

3,766

598

(410)

-

(637)

-

12,528

(9,211)

3,317

Furniture

6,385

(5,331)

1,054

183

-

-

(175)

6,568

(5,506)

1,062

Vehicles

872

(689)

183

82

(4)

-

(59)

-

925

(723)

202

Library Collection

4,960

(2,416)

2,544

267

(521)

5,227

(2,937)

2,290

Art Collection

779

-

779

34

813

-

813

213,916

(29,537)

184,379

7,162

(435)

(3,623)

(6,887)

90

218,418

(37,732)

180,686


*The impairment has been recognised in other Comprehensive Income

Revaluation

All Parent land and buildings were revalued as at 31 December 2014 in accordance with NZIAS-16. The valuation was completed by independent valuers Andrew Parkyn BCom (VPM), PG Dip Com (Marketing), SPINZ, ANZIV, Vanesa Griffiths BCom (VPM), MPINZ and Brendon Bodger BCom, (VPM), SPINZ, ANZIV all Registered Valuers of Quotable Value. The valuation of buildings is completed to a component level on a market value basis where practical. Where market based evidence is insufficient, buildings are valued on an optimised depreciated replacement cost basis. The overall net effect of the revaluation decreased CPIT's Asset Revaluation Reserve by $6.775 million; land increased by $14.675 million and buildings decreased by $21.450 million. The decrease in buildings value mainly reflects earthquake repairs yet to be completed as at year end.

In 2014 there was no impairment of property.

In 2013 there was an impairment of property: Artbox $228,000 and C Block $3,395,000 due to the exorbitant cost to fully repair a decision was made to shorten its useful life.

Work in Progress

Expenditures recognised in the carrying amounts of Property, Plant and Equipment in the course of construction were:

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Institution Land and Buildings

18,255

2,122

18,255

2,122

Restriction of Title

Under the Education Act 1989, the Parent and Group are required to obtain the consent from the Ministry of Education to dispose or sell off property where the value of the property exceeds an amount determined by the Minister.

There are also various restrictions in the form of historic designations, reserve, and endowment encumbrances attached to land. All land and buildings of the Parent are subject to these restrictions.

Insurance of Assets

CPIT participates in collective procurement arrangement with our ITPs for its comprehensive insurance programme. All buildings and equipment are covered for material damage based on replacement value. The insurance programme has an annual limit for all claims made by the participating ITPs. For the Canterbury region this annual limit is $200 million. The excess on claims for the Canterbury region is calculated as a 5% of site value. For CPIT this creates an estimated maximum exposure to insurance excesses of $10 million.

Given that the combined ITP insurance cap within the Canterbury region is $200 million (fire is $100 million), in the event of a large one-off event at the Madras and Sullivan sites, CPIT and other affected ITPs would be under insured.

Note 8
Intangible Assets




2013

Gross
Carrying

Amount

1 January 2014

$000


Accumulated

Amortisation

1 January 2014

$000

Net
Carrying

Amount

1 January 2014

$000


Current
Year

Additions

$000

Current
Year

Impairment

Charges

$000


Current
Year

Amortisation

$000

Gross
Carrying

Amount

31 December 2014

$000


Accumulated

Amortisation

31 December 2014

$000

Net
Carrying

Amount

31 December 2014

$000

Parent and Group –
Radio Frequency

410

(57)

353

(20)

410

(77)

333

Parent and Group – Software

4,554

(3,114)

1,440

102

-

(299)

4,656

(3,413)

1,243

4,964

(3,171)

1,793

102

-

(319)

5,066

(3,490)

1,576




2013

Gross
Carrying

Amount

1 January 2013

$000


Accumulated

Amortisation

1 January 2013

$000

Net
Carrying

Amount

1 January 2013

$000


Current
Year

Additions

$000

Current
Year

Impairment

Charges

$000


Current
Year

Amortisation

$000

Gross
Carrying

Amount

31 December 2013

$000


Accumulated

Amortisation

31 December 2013

$000

Net
Carrying

Amount

31 December 2013

$000

Parent and Group –
Radio Frequency

410

(36)

374

-

(21)

410

(57)

353

Parent and Group – Software

4,421

(2,859)

1,562

133

-

(255)

4,554

(3,114)

1,440

4,831

(2,895)

1,936

133

-

(276)

4,964

(3,171)

1,793


In 2014 there was no impairment of intangible assets.

In 2013 there was no impairment of intangible assets.

Work in Progress

Expenditures recognised in the carrying amounts of intangibles in the course of creation were:

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Software

4

4

Note 9
Trade and Other Payables

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Trade Payables

4,722

4,361

4,789

4,458

Other Payables

3,826

1,961

3,826

1,961

Interest Payable

Related Party Payables

10

2

10

2

8,558

6,324

8,625

6,421


Trade and other payables are non-interest bearing and are normally settled by the 20th of the month following invoice, therefore the carrying value of trade and other payables approximates their fair value.

Note 10
Loans and Finance Leases

Maturity Analysis

2014

Parent

Group

Secured Loans

$000

Lease
Liabilities

$000

Secured Loans

$000

Lease
Liabilities

$000

Less than One Year

572

572

Later than One Year but not more than Five Years

531

531

1,103

1,103

Weighted Average Interest Rate

6.94%

6.94%

2013

Parent

Group

Secured Loans

$000

Lease
Liabilities

$000

Secured Loans

$000

Lease
Liabilities

$000

Less than One Year

542

-

542

Later than One Year but not more than Five Years

452

452

994

-

994

Weighted Average Interest Rate

5.51%

5.51%

Description of Material Leasing Arrangements

CPIT has entered into finance leases for various IT assets. The net carrying amount of the leased items is shown in Note 7.

The finance leases can be renewed at the option of CPIT.

CPIT has the option to purchase the asset at the end of the lease term.

There are no restrictions placed on CPIT by any of the finance leasing arrangements.

Contractural Maturity Analysis of Financial Liabilities

The table below analyses financial liabilities into relative maturity groupings based on the remaining period at balance date to the contractual maturity date. Future interest payments on floating rate debt are based on the floating rate on the instrument at balance date. The amounts disclosed are the contractual undiscounted cash flows.

Carrying

Amount

$000

Contractural

Cash

Flows

$000

Less

than

6 months

$000

6 to 12

months

$000

1 to 2

years

$000

2 to 3

years

$000

More

than

3 years

$000

Parent 2014

Finance Leases

1,103

1,103

300

272

369

162

Secured Loans

-

-

Total

1,103

1,103

300

272

369

162

-









Group 2014

Finance Leases

1,103

1,103

300

272

369

162

Secured Loans

Total

1,103

1,103

300

272

369

162









Parent 2013

Finance Leases

994

994

296

246

328

124

Secured Loans

Total

994

994

296

246

328

124

-









Group 2013

Finance Leases

994

994

296

246

328

124

Secured Loans

-

-

-

-

Total

994

994

296

246

328

124









Note 11
Employee Benefit Liabilities and Other Provisions

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Employee Entitlements

Accrued Pay

1007

793

1,007

793

Annual Leave

2,385

2,258

2,385

2,258

Long Service Leave

214

197

214

197

Retirement Gratuities

765

614

765

614

Sick Leave

188

169

188

169

As at 31 December

4,559

4,031

4,559

4,031






Current Portion

3,730

3,312

3,730

3,312

Non-Current Portion

829

719

829

719

4,559

4,031

4,559

4,301


The present value of the long service leave and retirement gratuity obligations depends on factors that are determined on an actuarial basis using a number of assumptions. Two key assumptions used in calculating this liability include the discount rate and the salary inflation factor. Any changes in these assumptions will impact on the carrying amount of the liability. Expected future payments are disclosed using forward discount rates derived from the yield curve of NZ Government Bonds. The discount rates used match, as closely as possible, the estimated future cash flows. The salary inflation factor has been determined after considering historical salary inflation patterns and after obtaining advice from an independent actuary.

Note 12
Revenue Received in Advance

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Government Grants

314

213

314

213

Fees Income

5,660

5,893

5,660

5,893

Other Revenue in Advance

525

547

525

547

6,499

6,653

6,499

6,653






Current Portion

6,499

6,653

6,499

6,653

6,499

6,653

6,499

6,653

Note 13
Capital Commitments and Operating Leases

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Capital Commitments Approved and Contracted

11,213

11,524

11,213

11,524

Non-cancellable Operating Lease Commitments

Property Leases

Not later than One Year

904

1,122

183

160

Later than One Year and not later than Five Years

1,854

2,506

288

381

Later than Five Years

3,398

3,620

30

91

6,156

7,248

501

632

Equipment Leases

Not later than One Year

463

468

463

468

Later than One Year and not later than Five Years

1,371

1,834

1,371

1,834

1,834

2,302

1,834

2,302

Description of Material Leasing Arrangements

Property Leases

The property leases can be renewed at the option of CPIT.

CPIT does not have the option to purchase the property asset at the end of the lease term.

There are no restrictions placed on CPIT by any of the property leasing arrangements.

Equipment Leases

The equipment leases can be renewed at the option of CPIT.

CPIT does have the option to purchase the equipment asset at the end of the lease term.

There are no restrictions placed on CPIT by any of the equipment leasing arrangements.

Note 14
Contingent Assets and Liabilities

CPIT Parent

As at 31 December 2014 CPIT had no contingent liabilities.

As at 31 December 2014 CPIT had contingent assets relating to insurance proceeds of repairs to buildings resulting from the earthquakes. Please refer to Note 21 for further explanation.

CPIT has insurance covering material damage and business interruption and is currently negotiating both with the insurers. The final cost to remediate the damage resulting from the earthquakes is still to be fully quantified. It is expected that all costs, less insurance related excesses, will be met through the CPIT Insurance cover.

As at 31 December 2013 CPIT had no contingent liabilities.

As at 31 December 2013 CPIT had contingent assets relating to insurance proceeds of repairs to buildings resulting from the earthquakes. Please refer to Note 21 for further explanation.

CPIT Group

No other entity in the Group apart from CPIT have any contingencies (2013 nil).

Note 15
Related Party Transactions

CPIT is the Parent of the Group and controls three entitites, being Ōtautahi Education Development Trust, Christchurch Polytechnic Foundation and CPIT Holdings Ltd.

Significant transactions with government-related entities

The government influences the roles of CPIT as well as being a major source of revenue. CPIT has received funding and grants from the Tertiary Education Commission totalling $57.1m (2013 $57.0m) to provide education and research services for the year ended 31 December 2014. CPIT also leases at a nil rental amount, land and buildings legally owned by the Crown. Further information on the accounting for Crown-owned land and buildings is disclosed in the Statement of Accounting Policies under the heading "critical judgements in applying accounting policies".

Collectively, but not individually, significant transactions with government-related entities

In conducting its activities, CPIT is required to pay various taxes and levies (such as GST, PAYE and ACC levies) to the Crown and entities related to the Crown. The payment of these taxes and levies is based on the standard terms and conditions that apply to all tax and levy payers. CPIT is exempt from paying income tax and FBT.

CPIT purchases goods and services from entities related to the Crown and it also provides services to entities related to the Crown. The purchase and provision of goods and services to government-related entities for the year ended 31 December 2014 are small when compared to CPIT's total expenditure and revenue and have all been conducted on an arm's length basis. The purchase of goods and services included the purchase of electricity from Meridian, air travel from Air New Zealand and postal services from New Zealand Post. The provision of sevices to government-related entities is mainly related to the provision of educational courses.

Inter-Group Transactions

Christchurch Polytechnic Foundation

Christchurch Polytechnic Foundation is accounted for as a subsidiary of CPIT.

The Foundation runs an annual grants programme for staff, students and projects associated with CPIT, as well as other initiatives which promote education and enterprise in the region. CPIT appoints four of the nine trustees of the Christchurch Polytechnic Foundation.

During 2014, CPIT's income included the following transactions with the Christchurch Polytechnic Foundation:

2014
$

2013
$

Grants

64,150

57,227




During 2014 CPIT's expenditure included the following transactions with the CPIT Foundation:

2014
$

2013
$

Lease of B Block

-

18,657

Lease of ML Block

122,817

132,637




At 31 December 2014 CPIT did not owe Foundation any monies, Foundation owed CPIT $189.

At 31 December 2013 neither CPIT or the Foundation had monies owing to the other.

CPIT Holdings Ltd

CPIT Holdings Ltd, a wholly owned subsidiary of CPIT, was incorporated under the Companies Act 1993 on 26 September 2005.

In 2014 CPIT had no transactions with CPIT Holdings Ltd.

At 31 December 2014 neither CPIT nor CPIT Holdings Ltd had monies owing to the other.

At 31 December 2013 neither CPIT nor CPIT Holdings Ltd had monies owing to the other.

Ōtautahi Education Development Trust

Ōtautahi Education Development Trust is accounted for as a subsidiary of CPIT.

For accounting purposes only the OEDT is a controlled entity under NZ IAS 27.

CPIT appoints three of the six trustees of the Ōtautahi Education Development Trust.

During 2014 CPIT’s income included the following transactions with the Trust:

2014
$

2013
$

Income

24,000

74,000


During 2014 CPIT’s expenditure included the following transactions with the Trust:

2014
$

2013
$

Lease of Student Accommodation Block

481,000

481,000

Lease of B Block Car Park

8,522

4,645

Lease of Paxus House

320,420

320,420

Lease of ground for Jazz School Building

25,755

25,755




At 31 December 2014 neither CPIT nor the Trust had monies owing to the other.

At 31 December 2013 neither CPIT nor the Trust had monies owing to the other.

Key Management Related Party Transactions

During the year, the following people were members of organisations that have entered into transactions with CPIT as part of its normal operations.




2014

Purchases
Actual


$000

Sales
Actual

$000

Accounts
Payable
Actual
$000

Accounts
Receivable
Actual
$000

Chief Executive

Hana O'Regan

Te Tapuae o Rēhua (Executive Board)

57

-

Te Pae Kahika - Te Runanga o Ngai Tahu (Advisory Group member

-

5

Kotahi Mano Kaika (Committee member)

-

6

Woolston Primary School (Board Member)

-

1

Council Members

Canterbury Employers' Chamber of Commerce

13

1

1

Tai Poutini Polytechnic

31

12

8

Canterbury Communications Trust

-

36

-

3

Nurse Maude

10

-

-

-




2013

Purchases
Actual


$000

Sales
Actual

$000

Accounts
Payable
Actual
$000

Accounts
Receivable
Actual
$000

Chief Executive

Te Tapuae o Rēhua (Director)

71

7

-

Hana O'Regan

Te Tapuae o Rēhua (Executive Board)

71

7

Other Related Parties

CPIT is a member of the Tertiary Accord of New Zealand (TANZ), a separate entity launched in early 2000 as an alliance between six of New Zealand's leading tertiary education institutes, to promote best practice in applied education.

During 2014 TANZ invoiced CPIT $179,400 for 2014 and 2015 membership fees (2013: $89,700)and $28,750 being contribution to funding a pilot elearning delivery structure.
During 2014 CPIT invoiced TANZ $318,490 (2013: $286,571) for various services on normal commercial terms.

At 31 December 2014 CPIT did not owe TANZ any monies, TANZ owed CPIT $44,036.
At 31 December 2013 CPIT did not owe TANZ any monies, TANZ owed CPIT $26,463.

CPIT ceased to be a shareholder in Polytechnics International NZ Ltd (PINZ) in May 2014.

There were no other related party transactions.

Key Management Personnel Compensation

Parent

Group

2014

$000

2013

$000

2014

$000

2013

$000

Council Member Fees

149

149

149

149

Other Key Management Personnel

Salaries and Other Short-term Employee Benefits

1,774

1,592

1,774

1,592

Post-Employment Benefits

41

30

41

30

Total Key Management Personnel Compensation

1,964

1,771

1,964

1,771


Key management personnel includes all Council Members, the Chief Executive and Division Directors.

Note 16
Financial Instrument Risks

CPIT has a series of policies to manage the risks associated with financial instruments. CPIT is risk averse and seeks to minimise exposure from its treasury activities. CPIT has an established Council-approved Financial Management Policy.

Price risk

Price risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument will fluctuate as a result of changes in market prices.
As the Parent only engages in non-speculative investment it is not exposed to undue price risk.
The CPIT Group is exposed to equity securities price risk on its investments, which are classified as financial assets available for sale.
This price risk arises due to market movements in listed securities. This price risk is managed by diversification of the investment portfolio.

Currency risk

Currency risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument will fluctuate due to changes in foreign exchange rates.
CPIT is not exposed to currency risk as it does not hold financial instruments denominated in foreign curriences.

Interest rate risk

The interest rates on CPIT's investments are disclosed in Note 5 and on CPIT's borrowings in Note 10. CPIT has undertaken a sensitivity analysis of its exposure to interest rate risk on both investments and borrowings. If weighted average interest rates on bank deposits throughout 2014 had fluctuated by plus or minus 2% the effect would have been to increase/decrease the net surplus by $1,265,659 (2013: $1,056,361) as a result of higher/lower interest income on bank deposits.

Fair value interest rate risk

Fair value interest rate risk is the risk that the value of a financial instrument will fluctuate due to changes in market interest rates. Borrowing issued at fixed rates exposes CPIT to fair value interest rate risk.

CPIT has a Debt Management policy designed to ensure debt levels are sustainable and servicing costs are minimised.

Cash flow interest rate risk

Cash flow interest rate risk is the risk that the cash flows from a financial instrument will fluctuate because of changes in market interest rates. Borrowings and investments issued at variable interest rates expose CPIT to cash flow interest rate risk. CPIT has a Debt Management policy designed to ensure debt levels are sustainable and servicing costs are minimised.

Credit risk

Credit risk is the risk that a third party will default on its obligation to CPIT causing CPIT to incur a loss.

Where appropriate CPIT undertakes credit checks on potential debtors before granting credit terms.

CPIT has no significant concentrations of credit risk in relation to debtors and other receivables.

The Parent invests funds only in deposits with registered banks and its Financial Management policy limits the amount of credit exposure to any one institution to 30% of total investment.

The CPIT Group's exposure to credit risk on its investments is managed by diversification of the investment portfolio.

Liquidity risk

Liquidity risk is the risk that CPIT will encounter difficulty raising liquid funds to meet commitments as they fall due.

CPIT's Financial Management policy allows short term borrowing to be used to manage liquidity/working capital.

Such borrowing takes cognisance of cash flow forecasting and any contingencies which may arise and does not exceed the maximum approved by the Minister of Education.

Concentration of risk

Apart from exposure to the instituitions holding the Group's investments and borrowings, the Group is not exposed to any significant concentration of risk.

Note 17
Fair Value of Financial Instruments


CPIT considers that the carrying amounts of financial assets and financial liabilities recorded in the financial statements approximate their fair values. The fair values and net fair values of financial assets and financial liabilities are determined as follows:

- the fair value of financial assets and financial liabilities with standard terms and conditions and traded on active liquid markets are determined with reference to quoted market prices.

- for investments in other companies where quoted market prices are not available and valuation techniques are not appropriate, CPIT has determined fair value using cost less impairment.

For those instruments recognised at fair value in the Statement of Financial Position, fair values are determined according to the following hierarchy:

1 Quoted market price - Financial instruments with quoted prices for identical instruments in active markets.

2 Valuation technique using observable inputs - Financial instruments with quoted prices for similar instruments in active markets or quoted prices for identical or similar instruments in active markets and financial instruments valued using models where all significant inputs are observable.

3 Valuation techniques with significant non-observable inputs - Financial instruments valued using models where one or more significant inputs are not observable.

The following table analyses the basis of the valuation of classes of financial instruments measured at fair value in the Statement of Financial Position:

Total


$000

Quoted
Market

$000

Observable
inputs
price
$000

Significant
non-observable
inputs price
$000

31 December 2014 - Group Financial Assets

Managed Investment Portfolio

2,760

2,760

0

0


31 December 2013 - Group Financial Assets

Managed Investment Portfolio

2,557

2,557

0

0

Note 18
Capital Management

CPIT's capital is its equity which comprises general funds and revaluation reserves.
Equity is represented by net assets.
CPIT manages its revenues, expenses, assets, liabilities, and general financial dealings prudently.
CPIT’s equity is largely managed as a by-product of managing income, expenses, assets, and liabilities.

The objective of managing CPIT’s equity is to ensure CPIT effectively achieves its goals and objectives for which it has been established, whilst remaining a going concern.

Note 19
Variances to Budget

Statement of Financial Performance

Other Income exceeded budget by $0.5m, due to the combined effect of a number of small improvements in non-education delivery income sources.

Other Expenses were $1.4m below budget. Notable factors in this were:

-$0.5m of savings in insurance costs

-$0.4m lower travel costs

-$0.4m lower class materials costs

The original budget had anticipated completion of insurance remediation claims. This is still being completed. Insurance income was recognised to the level of 2014 costs only.

Overall the Net Surplus was $22.7m less than budget. Excluding the effects of Earthquake related Income and Expenses, the Net Surplus was $2.0m ahead of budget.

Statement of Financial Position

Land and Buildings are $42m less than budget. There were two main factors in the variance.

Changes in schedule for the 2015 building programme resulted in capital purchasing being $36.6m less than budgeted.

In addition,the year and revaluation of land and buildings resulted in a reduction in value of $6.8m.

Statement of Cash Flows

As noted above, capital purchasing was $36.6m less than budgeted.

There is a variance in the cash flows from Financing Activities due to capital grants ($9.5m) being budgeted but for which receipt will now occur in 2015.

Statement of Changes in Equity

Closing Equity is below budget by $35.7m due to:

-Net Surplus was $22.7m less than budget

-$9.5m capital injection from the crown not occurring in 2014

-Revaluation of Land and Buildings reducing Comprehensive Income by $6.8m

-Offsetting this is a $3.2 higher actual opening Retained Earnings compared to budget, due to the timing of the budget being set pre year end.

Note 20
Post Balance Date Events

There were no significant events after balance date.

Note 21
February 2011 Earthquake

The Event

Following the Canterbury earthquakes there has been some damage to CPIT's buildings and assets.

The table below outlines CPIT's estimate of the total cost to its operations from the Canterbury earthquakes:

Total estimate as at:


Type of earthquake damage

31 December 2014

$000

31 December 2013

$000

Comment

Impairment of buildings

5,983

5,983

Four buildings fully impaired and
one building partially impaired

Building remediation and repair

50,771

34,155

Movement due to project manangement costs and scoping and additional costs identified as repair work undertaken, or to be undertaken.

Other costs

2,965

2,828

Plant and equipment replaced

183

183

Total estimated cost of impact of earthquakes

59,902

43,149

To date, CPIT has estimated $50.8m building remediation and repair costs will be incurred in total from the event (2013: $34.2m). This includes repair work already complete.
The following sections provide more information on the costs outlined above.

Nature of Assets Affected

Land and Buildings

In 2011, CPIT's land underwent geotechnical assessment and no apparent land damage was evident. Following the earthquake events and each subsequent aftershock, all CPIT buildings were checked by independent engineers. Four buildings suffered a level of damage significant enough for them to be fully impaired. The value of these impaired buildings was $2.2m. One building was partially impaired by $0.4m and the associated cost to reinstate has been capitalised. All other CPIT buildings on both campuses were cleared by engineers for continued occupation and have been in full continual use since being progressively reoccupied since 4 April 2011. For 2013, C block was impaired by $3.4m due to the high cost to fully repair and as such the decision has been made to shorten its useful life. There have been no other earthquake related building impairments identified.

Plant and Equipment

Arising from the earthquakes there has been some damage to plant and equipment.
The assets that were identified as being damaged had minimal book value.

Estimated Costs to Repair Building Damage

Current estimates have quantified the damage to be in the region of $50.8m (2013: $34.2m). The revaluation of buildings at 31/12/2014 took account of the estimated state of repair of the buildings. Therefore, the outstanding remedial work will be recognised as capital expenditure when incurred.

The final cost to remediate the damage resulting from the earthquakes is still to be fully quantified. As repair work is started, additional damage may be discovered and as a result the cost of repair may increase. It is expected that all costs, less insurance related excesses, will be met through the CPIT Insurance cover (refer to Note 14). A work plan that details the full extent of the building repair work is an ongoing process.

The 2013 and 2014 estimates have been established as a result of detailed engineering evaluations by Pace Project Management which have been peer reviewed. These evaluations have then been costed by quantity surveyors.

Insurance

CPIT has a comprehensive insurance policy in place covering the institution on risks associated with this event in terms of material damage and business interruption. As outlined in Note 14, CPIT has estimated that it has a contingent asset relating to insurance proceeds. CPIT has been unable to recognise any future insurance proceeds as they cannot be sufficiently reliably measured for recognition in the financial statements.

Expenditure Incurred to Date

Expenditure recognised in the Statement of Financial Performance during 2014 comprised $6.9m of which $6.8m related to the costs of remediating the building damage caused by the earthquakes and $0.1m to other event related expenses.

Expenditure recognised in the Statement of Financial Performance during 2013 comprised $6.5m of which $6.4m related to the costs of remediating the building damage caused by the earthquakes and $0.1m to other event related expenses.

Costs as per Statement of Financial Performance

2014
$000

2013
$000

Additional Costs

Fees and Services

137

65

Repairs and Maintenance

6,829

6,388

6,966

6,453

The expenses paid directly to contractors by the insurance company represent a portion of the costs to remediate CPIT's buildings.

Download Section

Te Kōrero mō Kā Rawa Statement of Resources

as at 31 December 2014

Gender

Allied

Management

Teaching

Total

Academic

F

30.6

1.0

31.6

M

10.6

10.6

41.3

1.0

42.3

Business Development

F

24.2

1.0

25.2

M

11.0

1.0

12.0

35.2

2.0

37.2

Corporate Services

F

48.2

48.2

M

66.8

1.0

67.8

115.1

1.0

116.1

Education & Applied Research

F

97.7

1.0

204.7

303.4

M

56.6

197.4

253.9

154.3

1.0

402.0

557.3

Executive

F

2.8

4.0

6.8

M

1.3

1.3

4.2

4.0

8.2

Student Services

F

55.0

1.0

56.0

M

14.7

14.7

69.7

1.0

70.7

Total FTES

419.7

10.0

402.0

831.7


Total FTES by Gender

F

258.6

8.0

204.7

471.3

M

161.1

2.0

197.4

360.4


Percentage of FTES by Gender

F

61.6%

80.0%

50.9%

56.7%

M

38.4%

20.0%

49.1%

43.3%


Note: This data is rounded to one decimal place.

Land and Buildings

Land area owned by CPIT

17.58 hectares

Land area leased by CPIT

1.14 hectares

Buildings owned by CPIT

81,709 square metres gross floor area

Buildings leased by CPIT

870 square metres gross floor area

Library Collection

 

2014

2013

Printed books

45,857

45,715

Electronic books

43,750

38,066

 

Print serial titles

317

327

Electronic serial titles

28,578

28,843

 

Artworks Collection

 

2014

2013

Catalogued items

375

342

Download Section

Te Reta a te Kaitātari Kaute Auditor's Report

 

Download Section

Te Pūroko a te Kaiwhakahaere Council Chair Report

 

Read Council Chair Report  

Council Chair Report  

CPIT's Council is looking toward the future, implementing a number of initiatives in 2014 that will enable CPIT to continue to contribute to a robust regional economy and build solid foundations for the provision of vocational training for years to come.

The first buildings of our Campus Master Plan work took shape this year. The new Whareora (Science and Wellbeing Facility), opening in February 2015, and new buildings at the trades campus will house modern facilities and embedded technology enabling modernisation of training delivery. Our tutors are exploring ways to make learning more engaging, more individualised and more aligned with technology being used in industry.

This is just the start of our 10 year programme of modernisation across both campuses. Refurbishment work has already begun on a number of other buildings and design work is well advanced for another two new buildings at Madras St.

Our strong financial position has enabled CPIT to fund the majority of the Campus Master Plan programme, along with government support for improving our trades facilities.

This project signals a major shift for the institute. Alongside the physical upgrading are advances in delivery – technology, embedding numeracy and literacy, tracking graduate outcomes and offering more flexible learning options that are robust and effective.

Another major shift is our sustainability initiative. Work that commenced in 2014 is already changing the way we think about financial, social, environmental and compliance sustainability at CPIT.

We are looking at how every programme in the institute incorporates and respects sustainability, how we choose suppliers, how we design buildings and reduce our waste. This work is driven by our determination to be a responsible corporate citizen, to contribute to the sustainability of our planet and to prepare students for a world in which sustainability gains more and more prominence in professional and personal contexts.

Our students are in some ways ahead of us; they have launched CPIT's first sustainability festival this year and they are investigating sustainable technology, solutions and themes right across the institute. They will one day be leaders in shaping the future - and that day is coming very soon if our recent graduates are any indication.

We're proud of their success and of all of our graduates who follow their dreams. The publication of our Eke Takaroa booklet revealed a lot more successes, this time of Maori graduates who are working in their chosen fields and often running their own companies. We have a special duty to support Maori and Pasifika to succeed and a lot of energy has gone into supporting students to lift their achievement outcomes and celebrating their success.

CPIT works closely with our industry partners. We are collaborating on Christchurch's new Health Precinct and we are investigating working more closely with Aoraki Polytechnic in South Canterbury.

It has been a busy year but CPIT has kept its focus on core responsibilities to its students and stakeholders, maintaining our top position for educational outcomes and financial performance in the ITP sector. 

Our Chief Executive, management, allied staff and tutors have made 2014 an extraordinary year and I would like to congratulate them all on their efforts.

Jenn Bestwick
Council Chair

Read Council Chair Report - Māori Translation  

Council Chair Report - Māori Translation  

Kai te aro atu te Kaunihera o CPIT ki kā wā e heke ana ki ruka i a tātou, kua arotahi atu ki te whakatinanataka o kā kaupapa e taea ai te whakapakari tonu i te pūtea ā-rohe kia pakari, kia pūmau te whakatū kaupapa ā-rehe haere ngā tau, haere ngā tau.

I whakatūria kā whare tuatahi mai o te Rautaki Matua i tēnei tau. Ko Whareora (Pūtaiao me te Hauora), ka whakatuwherahia hai te Maramarua o te tau 2015, ko kā whare hou ki Te Pūtahi Whakarehe hai whakawhare i kā rauemi hai whakahākai i te āhua o te ako ki te āhua o te ao hurihuri e noho nei tātou. E wānaka ana ā mātou kaiako i te āhua o te ako kia kaha ake ai te ū mai a te tauira, te hākai ki ia tauira, me te hākai ki te ao mahi.

He tīmataka noa tēnei o tēnei rautaki tekau tau te roa hai whakahou i ō tātou wāhi ako katoa. Kua timata kē te whakahōu i ētahi atu whare, ā, he nui hoki kā mahi kua oti i te taha hoahoa hei whakarite i kā whare e rua ki Madras.

He whenua haumako ō CPIT i taea ai te rahika o kā mahi i Te Rautaki Matua te utu, he moni anō i homai e te kāwanataka hai whakapai i kā whare ā-rehe.

He tohu tēnei kaupapa kua aro kē atu a CPIT. Ka haere tahi te whakapai whare, te whakapai ako, te taha hakarau, te whakauru i kā kaupapa tatau me te tuhi, te āta whai i kā wāhi tau ai kā ihuputa, ā, ko te akaaka ako pīkore anō hoki.

Ko te whakauka tētahi atu aroka matua hou. Kua rerekē haere kā whakaaro ki te moni, ki te hapori, ki te taiao i ruka i kā tikaka whakauka i whakamanahia i te tau 2014.

Kai te aro atu mātou kia whai wāhi kā tikaka whakauka ki kā kaupapa ako katoa, ki kā tikaka whiriwhiri kaiwhakarato, ki te haka o kā whare, ki te whakaiti parapara hoki. Ka whakahaeretia tēnei mahi i ruka i te here aumakea ki te mana o ēnei āhua i roto i te ao rakatōpū, ki te tiaki hoki i te ora o tō tātou ao whānui, ā, ki te whakarite i ā tātou tauira ki te whai i ēnei āhua e rakatira haere ana puta noa.

I ēnei āhua kua tū ā mātou tauira ki te ihu o tō mātou waka; i whakarewahia e rātou te hui taurima tuatahi o CPIT hai whakanui i te mahi whakauka, ā, kai te wānaka i kā hakarau whakauka, i te whakauka hai rautaki matua mō CPIT whānui. He wā anō, ko rātou tonu kā mea whakatere i kā waka ki kā pae e ora ai te ao – I ruka i te āhua o kā ihu puta kātahi anō ka puta, ka whakapae ka tau taua wā ki a tātou ākuanei.   

E whakahīhī pai ana mātou i te akitu o ā tātou ihu puta e takahi ana ki ō rātou pae wawata. I te whakarewataka o te pukapuka Eke Takaroa i kitea rā anōtia tēnei mea te akitu, ka mutu, he Māori katoa kā tāngata i tēnei pukapuka e kōrerohia ana ā rātou whai mātauraka i kā kaupapa i whiria e rātou, i te whakahaere kamupene hoki o te rahika. He kaupapa mana nui te tautoko i Te Aitaka a Kiwa kia eke, kua whakapau kaha i ēnei mahi hai toko ake i a rātou kia tino eke ai ā rātou mahi, kia mihia hoki tā rātou eke.

He rite tonu te mahi kātahi a CPIT me ana haumi. Kua whakahoahoa atu ki te Pūtahi Hauora hōu, ā, kai te wānaka i tā mātou ko Te Kuratini o Aoraki mahi tahi.

He nui kā mahi i tēnei tau ekari e arotahi ana a CPIT ki ana here matua, ki ana tauira, ki ana haumi, ki tana hapori, ki te pupuri i tana turaka ki te tihi o te whakataka hua nō te ako, ki te noho ki tana whenua haumako.

Heke iho i te Kaiārahi, kā pou whakahaere, kā kaitautoko, kā kaiako, he nui kā mahi kua oti, he nui kā hua kua taka mai i tēnei tau. Me mihi ka tika.

Jenn Bestwick
Council Chair

Download Section

Ko Tā te Kaunihera Governance and Accountability

CPIT is a Crown Entity governed by its own council with accountability to the shareholding Minister, through the Tertiary Education Commission (TEC).  It is made up of eight members, four of whom are appointed by the Minister for Tertiary Education, and four of whom are appointed by the CPIT Council under Council Statute.

As CPIT’s governing body, CPIT Council has several key responsibilities: to appoint and manage the performance of the Chief Executive and to reflect the interests of the organisation’s key stakeholders: the government, through the Minister’s appointments, and the businesses and communities of the region, through the council appointments.  The council directs the management of CPIT to achieve planned outcomes and to ensure that the organisation is acting prudently, legally and ethically.

CPIT operates under a number of Acts of Parliament – particularly the Education Act 1989 No 80 and the Local Government Official Information and Meetings Act 1987 No 174.

Ms Jenn E Bestwick
Chair
Appointed by the Minister
Mrs Elizabeth M Hopkins
Deputy Chair
Appointed by the Minister
Ms Jane C Cartwright
Appointed by the CPIT Council
Mr Stephen J Collins
Appointed by the Minister
Mr David L Halstead
Chair, Council Audit Committee
Appointed by the CPIT Council
Mr John H Hunter
Appointed by the CPIT Council
Mr John K Mote
Appointed by the Minister
Ms Lynne Harata Te Aika
Appointed by the CPIT Council
Download Section

Te Pūroko a te Tumuaki Chief Executive Report

 

Read Chief Executive Report  

Chief Executive Report  

In 2014 CPIT held its largest ever graduation ceremony. Over 800 graduands attended our autumn graduation ceremony in person to receive qualifications that ranged from certificates to degrees to graduate diplomas.

Every one of those graduands had a story – of challenges, of struggle and ultimately of success. Behind all of the statistics are stories of people changing their lives for the better, going after the careers they want and shaping their own futures. And that's what motivates our institute to keep building solid foundations for success by working with our industry partners, serving our communities and delivering outcomes that align with government expectations.

We had our biggest year at our trades campus, whilst building new trades training facilities that will improve the learning experience for students by better integrating theory and practice through targeted technology. Our graduates are helping to rebuild Christchurch and we are working to ensure that all Cantabrians have the opportunity to contribute.

Many of those new tradespeople are women, following a campaign supported by the Ministry of Women's Affairs to encourage more women to take advantage of the opportunities a career in trades can offer. Many other graduates were Maori and Pasifika, who signed up for our now well-established, fee-free, He Toki ki te Rika (Maori Trades Training) and Pasifika Trades Training programmes to improve the lives of themselves and their families.  

We also had our largest intake of youth pathway students for Canterbury Tertiary College and Youth Guarantee, providing alternatives for 15-19 year olds to transition to further tertiary study or to employment.

Our close links with industry increased opportunities for students to work in industry-standard facilities, gain work placement opportunities and find employment upon completion of their training. 

At our Madras Street campus, the same thing was happening, with internships, networking and industry visits playing an important part of most qualifications, from nursing to broadcasting to engineering and architectural studies. Industry heavyweights from ICT, from the New Zealand music industry and from art & design all visited CPIT and continued to contribute to the education and work-readiness of our students.

We are collaborating on Christchurch's new Health Precinct; we offered a number of targeted training initiatives through Skills for Canterbury; and we assisted many professionals to put their experience towards academic credits through our Centre of Assessment of Prior Learning.

We supported our community through sponsorships, specifically through our new Time 2 Give initiative, and got involved in a host of projects around town.

In 2014 CPIT began work on a new sustainability initiative across every facet of the institute and this will continue to grow and help to inform our direction in 2015.

And finally, I am pleased to say the hard work of our staff ensured that we maintained our financial performance and our students' completion rates.

Kay Giles
Chief Executive

Read Chief Executive Report - Māori Translation  

Chief Executive Report - Māori Translation  

I te tau 2014 i whakahaeretia e CPIT tā mātou whakapōtaetaka nui rawa atu o ā mātou whakapōtaetaka katoa.  Neke atu i te 800 kā tauira i tae ā-tinana atu ki te whakapōtaetaka o te Kahuru kia whakawhiwhia ki kā tohu, mai i kā tiwhikete ki kā tohu paetahi me kā tohu pōkairua paetahi.

He korero tā tēnā, tā tēnā o kā ihu puta – mō kā taero i whakaekehia e rātou, mō kā kaupapa i tohea, ā, tae atu ki ō rātou ekeka akitū .  He korero anō kai muri i kā tatauraka katoa mō kā tākata e rapu huarahi ana kia panonihia ō rātou oraka kia pai ake ai, ā, e whai ana hoki i kā huanui mahi kia whakaea ai i ō rātou wawata mō kā wā e heke mai ana.  Koirā kā momo āhuataka e whakahihiri ana i ā mātou ki te waihaka tonu i kā pūtake e akitu ai kā tākata, nā te mahi tahi ki kā hoa pakihi, nā kā honoka ki ō mātou hapori me te whakatutukika o kā whāika e hākai ana ki kā whāika kāwanataka hoki.

He tau tino nui rawa atu i Te Pūtahi Whakarehe, ā, he kaha hoki ki te whakatū i kā whare hōu hai whakapai ake i kā wheako ako ā kā tauira i te tūhonotaka o kā ariā mātauraka me kā mahi ā-rika mā te aroka hakarau.  Ko ā mātou ihu puta kā rika ā-rehe e hāpai ana i kā mahi whakatikatika i te rohe nei, ā, kai te whakapeto koi mātou ki te whakarite i kā huanui kia whāi wāhi ai kā tākata katoa o Waitaha ki ēnei mahi.

He tokomaha tonu kā wāhine i te huka ā-rehe, ā, i whakatairakatia tēnei kaupapa e Te Tari o Te Manatū Wahine hai akiaki i kā wāhine ki te whai i kā ara mahi huhua i kā mahi ā-rehe.  He tokomaha hoki kā ihu puta Māori me kā ihu puta nō te Moananui-a-Kiwa i puta mai i raro i te kaupapa utukore o He Toki ki te Rika me te Kā Mahi Whakarehe a Kiwa, kia whai oraka ai mō rātou me ō rātou whānau.

I piki ake hoki te tokomaha o te huka taiohi i uru mai ki kā kaupapa o Te Whare Takiura o Waitaha me te wāhaka o kā Kaupapa Tiaki Taiohi.  E āhei ana ēnei kaupapa i te uruka mai o kā taiohi mai i kā tau 15 ki te 19 ki kā ara mātauraka o kā wānaka, ki kā tūka mahi rānei.

Nā kā honoka tata ki kā ahumahi i nui ake ai kā āheitaka o kā tauira ki te ako i kā tū whare e whakamanahia ana e kā rōpū ahumahi, ki te whai tūka mahi harakotekote, ā, kia whai hoki i kā tūka mahi motuhake i te mutuka o ā rātou tohu.

I te wānaka ki Madras, i te pērā anō te nui o te aroka ki kā tūka mahi harakotekote o kā tauira, ki kā honoka ahumahi me te toroka mai o kā tākata ahumahi ki roto i kā kaupapa maha, mai i te tohu nēhi, te tohu pāpāho me te tohu waihaka pūrere , ki te kaupapa hoahoaka.  I taetae mai kā tohuka ahumahi nō roto mai i kā ao o te Hakarau Tiritiri Kōrero, te ao Pūoro o Aotearoa me te ao toi anō hoki, ki te toro mai ki Te Mātāpuna o Te Mātauraka, ā, ki te āwhina hoki i ā mātou tauira ki te whakarite i a rātou mō te ao o te mahi.

Kai te mahi tahi mātou i te kaupapa o te Takiwā Hauora o Ōtautahi; he nui kā ara ako matawhāiti i raro i te kaupapa o Skills for Canterbury; ā, tokomaha kā tohuka mahi i whakamanahia e Te Pokapū Whakawā i Kā Mātauraka o Mua.

Nā ā mātou pūtea tautoko i tohatoha atu ki ō mātou hapori rātou i hāpai ki te whakatipu, ā, he maha noa atu kā kaupapa i te taone i tautokohia.

I te tau 2014 i timata Te Mātāpuna o te Mātauraka ki te mahi i tētahi kaupapa whakapūmautaka e hākai ana ki kā mahi katoa o te wānaka, ā, mā tēnei tā mātou aroka e ārahi, e tohu i te tau 2015.

Ā, hai whakakapi i tēnei kōrero, nōhoku te whiwhi ki te kī atu i eke anō mātou i kā taumata i whāia i kā āhuataka o te taha pūtea me kā putaka o kā tauira.

Kay Giles
Chief Executive

Download Section

Kā Manukura Senior Management

Te Kāhui Manukura
Senior Leadership Team

Chief Executive
Ms Kay Giles
Master of Social Planing & Development (Queensland), BSc (Hons) (Queensland)

Kaiārahi
Ms Hana M O'Regan
MA (Otago), PGDip Arts, BA (Victoria), CELTA (Cambridge)

Director, Academic

Dr Shirley A Wilson (until 27 August 2014)
PhD (Western Australia), BSc (Hons) (Otago), Dip Nursing (CTI)

Mrs Sheila T McBreen-Kerr (from 3 December 2014)
BEd (Canterbury), DipTchg

Director, Business Development

Vacant

Director, Corporate Services and Chief Financial Officer
Mr Darren J Mitchell
BCom (Accounting) (Otago), CA (NZICA)

Director, Education and Applied Research 
Ms Judith A Brown
BA (Massey), PGDipEd, PGDipBusAdmin, DipEd for Deaf

Director, Governance and Strategy 
Ms Ann M Kilgour
MCom (Canterbury), BA (Canterbury), NZICA, MNZIM

Director, Partnership Project

Ms Patsy M Gibson

Director, Learning Environments
Mrs Fiona Haynes
MEd (Deakin), DipTchg, TTC, NZCD (Arch)

Director, Student Services
Ms Hana M O'Regan
MA (Otago), PGDip Arts, BA (Victoria), CELTA (Cambridge)

Manager, Skills for Canterbury
Mr Philip J Agnew
BAppMgt (CPIT), ATC (Joinery)

Heads of Department
Dr Catherine M Andrew
PhD (Newcastle), MA (Hons) (Massey), BA (Nursing/Education), Dip Nursing (Nelson Polytechnic)

Mrs Alison L Clear (until 12 March 2014)
PGDip Computer-Based Learning, Cert Computer Studies

Mr Tom Rainey (from 26 March 2014)
BMus (Canterbury)

Mr John West
BSc (Canterbury), DipTchg

Programme Leaders
Ms Rachel Butcher (from 26 March 2014 until 18 June 2014)
BEd (Canterbury), DipTchg, PGDipBusAdmin

Ms Hayley Devoy (from 2 July 2014)
Cert Adult Tchg, Cert Workplace Assessor Training, C&G Dip Food Prep & Cooking

Mr James W (Hemi) Hoskins
Ba (Language)

Section Senior Managers
Ms Fiona Macdonald (from 26 March 2014 until 8 October 2014)
BA (Hons) (UK), Dip Librarianship

Mr Mark Marshall
PGDipAppMgmt (CPIT)

Ms Emma J Meijer
Cert Office Technology & Travel